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BACKGROUND

Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) is a regional coalition of community leaders and non-governmental organisations working at the frontlines with populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS or who are often forgotten in access to treatment and health care programmes, including LGBT persons across the Caribbean.  Founded in 2004 by the late Dr. Robert Carr, CVC is the largest coalition of civil society organisations working with populations vulnerable to HIV/AIDS in the region.

 

Funding from The Robert Carr Fund (RCF)

The Robert Carr Fund (RCF) has a strong focus on the institutional strengthening of civil society networks, given the crucial role they play in addressing barriers to universal access to HIV-related services. When properly resourced, many networks influence important policy developments at the global, regional and national levels, which often lead to more effective and efficient programmes delivered by governments and civil society.

CVC is assisted by the RCF to realize its mandate to, among other things, facilitate sustained, coordinated and consistent mobilization and advocacy, driven by vulnerable groups and, potentially, leading to the kind of structural change that is required for addressing a concentrated HIV epidemic.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

CVC will support grant applications which fall under the following general areas:

  • Support for data entry (Human Resources, converting existing supporting documentation)
  • Interventions to promote the documentation of human right violations including: mobilization, sensitization sessions and strategic planning
  • Support for utilities directly related to the human rights violation documentation and support services
  • Community mobilization and support services

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Member organizations of the Caribbean Civil Society Shared Incident Database (SID) operating in Guyana and Suriname are eligible to apply.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of up to USD 10,000 to support project-related costs for up to 10 months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organizations past grant performance and proposal for strengthening and expanding its current work. Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the Application Form and Budget Proposal and the following criteria:

 

Relevance: Are objectives based on good serological and behavioural evidence and on evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

Efficiency: Are all available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes will be sustained in the future, beyond the GF support?

Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

Empowerment: Does the project demonstrate how it will support members of the target population to develop a sense of ownership of interventions and individual behaviour?

Leverage: Will this grant result in outside donations or government buy-in?

Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

Capacity Building: Will the project result in increased organizational and individual leadership skills for the community partner?

Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project involve collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity?

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download and complete the application documents attached and submit to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – “Shared Incident Database Mini-grants”. All applications must be received no later than: February 19, 2024.

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

TARGET

To enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enable data sharing to support redress through the establishment of THE SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE (SID). This online platform is a comprehensive data collection system through which Civil Society Organisations can record, analyse and exchange information on incidents of rights violations.

 

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Belize and Jamaica
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

KP receive HIV, GBV and human rights related services

  • Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using SID
  • Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments
  • Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Outputs/Means of Verification

Del 1: Sensitize community members and duty bearers on SID

  • Number of community members sensitized disaggregated by population and gender
  • Number of and stakeholder sensitized
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community)

Del 2: Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using

Progress report detailing:

  • number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).
  • Number and description of cases and the legal or non-legal redress.
  • Description of the services provided (e.g., support from medical personnel)

Del 3: Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments

Progress report detailing:

  • Advocacy Plan developed and implemented
  • Number of advocacy actions completed targetting duty bearers re HRV and KP. Description and evidence of the advocacy action and outcome.

Del 4: Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Progress Report detailing:

  • SID Data analysis conducted and disseminated
  • Number of duty bearers and rights holders sensitized re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 40% of payment triggered by the plan for the collection, monitoring, documentation of cases and proposed services to provide redress (including target for population supported)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

Year 2

  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on proposed data collection and services to provide redress must be submitted with the application.
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must be a member or apply to be a member of SID to document cases of human rights violations.
  • The organization must provide legal assistance to members of key populations, facilitating their access to justice.
  • The proposal must prioritize actions and strategies in search
  • of compensation/redress for damages.
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal):
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community); and
  • number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, FEBRUARY 09, 2024

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Sixteen (16) month grant commencing March 2024 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed).

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$25,000 over the grant period

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

A total of three (3) grants will be awarded.

 

HOW TO APPLY

Please download annexes A, B and C which are attached in the additional document section, fill them out and submit via email to: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, February 09, 2024. Please include subject line: SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE MICRO-GRANT

TARGET/ RATIONALE

Support for Differentiated service delivery (DSD) intervention models being implemented by CSO/CBO partners.

The DSD model of care is defined as a person-centred approach to HIV service delivery with services tailored to the needs of patients (taking into consideration sub-population, context and environment). Examples of DSD interventions are as follows:

  • Adherence clubs
  • Community outreach efforts to trace defaulters or provide treatment education or adherence support
  • Extended clinic hours
  • Family models
  • Fast track services
  • Multi-month dispensing
  • Nonstable patient models
  • Key population models
  • Youth models

 

DSD service delivery models can be grouped into the following four categories:

  1. Facility-based individual models, where clients are seen individually within health care facilities;
  2. Out-of-facility individual models, where clients are seen individually outside of health care facilities;
  3. Health care worker-managed group models, where clients are seen in a group managed by a health care worker, either a professional or law health care provider, within and/or outside of health care facilities; and

Client-managed group models, where clients meet in a group, generally outside of health care facilities[1].

 

WHO CAN APPLY?

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Suriname
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through:

  • Training of healthcare providers in DSD
  • Contribute to access to DSD for KP

Outputs/Means of Verification

Report detailing:

Deliverable 1: Training of healthcare providers in DSD

  • Training Plan developed and implemented
  • Training manual/curriculum developed
  • Number of healthcare providers trained in DSD

Del 2: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services

Del 3: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the workplan and strategy document
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on expanding DSD must be submitted with the application. The templates can be found in Annex E
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must submit a proposal and workplan for the expansion of DSD services
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal): number of persons reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services and number of person linked to care/referred for healthcare services

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

Selection of eligible projects will be done based on the scores and recommendations given by the evaluation committee. Decisions on the awarding of mini-grants will be made based on CVC/COIN’s experience with such partners and its funding priorities/ budget allocation from time to time.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s Coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, December 1st, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Eighteen (18) month grant commencing January 2024 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$26,000 over eighteen months (US$13,000 per year)

NUMBER OF GRANTS PER COUNTRY

One

HOW TO APPLY

Download the documents in annexes A, B and C, complete and submit to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, December 1st, 2023.

Please include subject line: COMMUNITY-BASED DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES MICRO-GRANT

[1] A Framing of Differentiated Service Delivery. https://differentiatedservicedelivery.org/wp-content/uploads/a-framing-of-differentiated-service-delivery-1.pdf

In light of the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic the Global Fund, through CARICOM, made additional funding available to the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities (CVC) and partners to undertake activities aimed at addressing specific issues exacerbated by the pandemic. Gender-based and intimate partner violence was an issue of grave concern before the pandemic and the lockdowns which accompanied Covid-19 made the situation worse for several individuals. It is therefore critical to keep the spotlight and attention on the issue.

CVC is pleased to announce a call for proposal (mini-grants) to support awareness raising campaigns focused on reducing the incidence and impact of gender-based and intimate partner violence on key population groups.

 

BACKGROUND

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development. Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. (World Health Organization 2019). Across the Caribbean, as elsewhere, transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

A PANCAP Policy Brief titled Gender-Based Violence, Health and HIV: Intersections and Implication for Achieving UNAIDS 95-95-95 targets in the Caribbean noted that once infected, people living with HIV who are also suffering abuse may experience escalation of violence upon disclosure of their status resulting in potentially lethal outcomes. GBV can also prevent survivors living with HIV from accessing lifesaving treatment and care, and the stress caused by abuse can further compromise their immune systems and accelerate the progression of the disease with significant implications for achieving the UNAIDS global 95-95-95 and by 2030, that is, 95% of people living with HIV are diagnosed and know their status; 95% of people who know their HIV status are on antiretroviral treatment; and 95% of people on treatment achieve viral suppressed.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

This call for proposals will provide small grants to support GBV Awareness Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with men. Campaigns should focus on at least one of the following general areas:

  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviours against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives including telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counseling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes, legal avenues such as protection orders

Entities may submit more than one application, each covering a different focus area and set of interventions

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key and vulnerable populations that are based in Belize, Jamaica, Suriname, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD per project to support project-related costs for up to six (6) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

CAMPAIGN DURATION 

Campaigns will run for six months – November 2023 to April 2024

ALL PROPOSALS SHOULD INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING DETAILS:

  1. Background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country context (including key challenges).
  2. Describe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes and any consultations held.
  3. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  4. Briefly outline the types of awareness actions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  5. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.
  6. Detailed Budget

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence asto which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerable groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to communications@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – GBV Awareness Campaign Grant Proposal.

All applications must be received no later than:  Sunday November 26th, 2023

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The COVID-19 global pandemic has precipitated an unprecedented global public health crisis requiring a global response and with far-reaching consequences for our economic, social, and political lives. While an event such as COVID-19 affects everyone indiscriminately, there are always those groups who face additional barriers through being excluded. It exaggerates the inequality that exists within the society. For many of the populations CVC serves, these inequalities have deepened underscoring the urgent need for targeted support and equitable solutions. This highlights the crucial importance of safe spaces where individuals can access services and openly discuss their challenges and concerns.

 

SAFE SPACE PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE
The model safe spaces should seek to create a “KP-friendly” physical or virtual environment, or a combination of both, for KP members in alignment with features that have been identified to likely promote a successful safe space in KP community programs including:

  • Physical and psychological safety (e.g. Mental and physical safety from harassment, bullying, and violence);
  • Sexuality and sexual health promotion (e.g. facilitated access to SRH services); Clear and consistent structure and appropriate supervision (e.g. guidelines for managing emotional, physical, or professional boundaries between peers, and staff/volunteers;
  • Supportive relationships (e.g. good communication and counseling);
  • Opportunities to belong (e.g. opportunities for meaningful inclusion regardless of a person’s gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc., opportunities for sociocultural identity formation, etc.);
  • Positive social norms (e.g. group behaviour rules such as respect for others, constructive feedback, inclusivity, cultural sensitivity, recognition of ethnicity, and non-judgmental);
  • Opportunities for skill building (e.g. opportunities for physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, and social skills building;
  • Ethical practice (e.g.  approach that supports autonomy and increases empowerment);
  • Anonymity (e.g. no requirement to disclose personal data, measures to ensure confidentiality); and
  • Behaviour management processes (e.g. expectations of behavior are communicated and reinforced).

PURPOSE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY 
To provide support for safe spaces for Key Population Communities to access HIV testing with a focus on self-testing, psychosocial, and other services.

FUNDING PRIORITY AREAS

This funding can be used to support diverse activities including but not limited to:

  1. HIV testing, linkage to appropriate HIV prevention, treatment, and care services, and other clinical and support services
  2. Psychosocial and Support Services for Key populations
  3. Sexual and Reproductive Health Education
  4. Advocacy activities to reduce stigma, discrimination, and human rights violation against Key Populations.
  5. Community-based activities to provide vocational and life skills.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname and Trinidad.

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to five (5) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

NB: Priority consideration will be given to those proposals which include Priorities 1 and 2 above.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance:  Are objectives based on good evidence asto which kinds of interventions are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency:  Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise, and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability:  Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused:  Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilisedgroups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage:  Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes:  Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of actionwith measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation:  Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’ssuccesses and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations:  Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term, and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download the application documents, fill them out and submit to programms@cvccoalition.org 

Please include the subject line SAFE SPACES GRANT PROPOSALAll applications must be received no later than November 7, 2023.

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

 

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

 

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence; 
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Covid-19 pandemic shifted focus from communication surrounding HIV prevention  and sexual and reproductive health to messaging aimed at reducing transmission of the Covid-19 virus. During the pandemic, concerns were raised about the negative impact the challenges brought on by Covid-19 would have on HIV rates across the region. In its publication ‘The Effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on the HIV response, UNAIDS pointed out that treatment chains were disrupted during the pandemic which resulted in individuals having difficulty accessing medication with some even falling out of treatment and care. Additionally, persons who were newly diagnosed during the pandemic had delays in being able to start treatment with some not starting at all. With the link to HIV treatment disrupted during the pandemic, supporting services such as mental health and psychosocial support were also disrupted, with some not getting back on track. UNAIDS also noted that the fallout from the pandemic resulted in sexual and reproductive health and rights services being scaled back. UNAIDS says the fallout also negatively impacted programmes for preventing vertical transmission, voluntary medical male circumcision, PrEP and other HIV prevention options.

 

Meanwhile, there has been a shift in access to HIV testing, with self-testing becoming more available. During the Covid-19 pandemic the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) pointed out that self testing was one way to help preserve access to HIV testing. In a December 2020 article the agency said in order to achieve the Fast Track targets that would set countries on course to end AIDS by 2030, it is imperative that people living with HIV are diagnosed early, start treatment right away and achieve an undetectable viral load. People who are virally suppressed are not able to transmit the virus. Testing is the critical first pillar of this “treatment as prevention” strategy. PAHO argued that even before COVID-19 the Caribbean was not on track to achieve the 90-90-90 testing and treatment targets by the end of 2020. In 2019, only 77% of all people living with HIV in the Caribbean knew their status, 81% of diagnosed people were on treatment and 80% of those on antiretroviral therapy were virally suppressed. A survey conducted by PANCAP and PAHO showed that during 2020, facility-and community- based HIV testing services reduced in two-thirds (69%) of countries due to COVID-19.

 

With the pandemic somewhat behind us and efforts are being increased to meet the 95-95-95 targets, focus is being placed on ways to ensure that access to HIV and sexual and reproductive health services are preserved to ensure that gains in the HIV response are not further negatively affected. To support this effort, the PANCAP_CVC_COIN Grant is seeking to implement advocacy campaigns focused on preserving access to HIV and sexual and reproductive health services using traditional and social media.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns focused on preserving access to HIV and sexual and reproductive health services using traditional and social media. 

 

FUNDING OBJECTIVES

Campaigns should support at least two (2) of the following objectives:

  • To share accurate messages and information about HIV prevention, access to services and sexual and reproductive health, through social and traditional media, while taking into account varying educational, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • To share information using social and traditional media advocating for increased access and uptake of HIV services to include HIV self-testing, treatment and care.
  • To share messaging using social and traditional media to promote and advocate for persons not in treatment and care to either begin or restart treatment.
  • To share advocacy messaging using social and traditional media aimed at increasing/improving access to HIV and sexual and reproductive health services for members of key population groups.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Jamaica, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago.  

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to six (6) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

CAMPAIGN DURATION 

Campaigns will run for six months – November 2023 to April 2024

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN 

All Proposals should include the following

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the problem the campaign seeks to address 
  3. Describe the key stakeholder groups, target groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the key advocacy messages, products (videos, graphics, etc.) and the methods of dissemination
  6. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  7. Detail budget

REVIEW PROCESS

 All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work. 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerable groups? 
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects. 

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to communications@cvccoalition.org 

Please include the subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Sunday November 05 , 2023.

 

SAFE SPACE FOR KEY POPULATION COMMUNITIES TO ACCESS TREATMENT AND SCREENING FOR STIS

Studies show that providing a safe space can be key in engaging and retaining Key Population (KP) members in HIV programming. By encouraging feelings of acceptance and a sense of belonging, safe spaces allow KPs to forge new ties with a community of helpers who can provide valuable support. The provision of a safe space is thus an essential component of effective key population development programmes aimed at health promotion

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) through funding under the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Global Fund Grant Agreement Number: QRB-C-OECS is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to support key population communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces.

The OECS Sustainability, Resilience and Movement toward an OECS Regional Health Agenda, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada. CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the key population component of the grant

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

SAFE SPACE PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE
The model safe spaces should seek to create a “KP-friendly” physical or virtual environment, or a combination of both, for KP members in alignment with features that have been identified to likely promote a successful safe space in KP community programs including:

  • Physical and psychological safety (e.g. Mental and physical safety from harassment, bullying, violence);
  • Sexuality and sexual health promotion (e.g. facilitated access to SRH services); Clear and consistent structure and appropriate supervision (e.g. guidelines for managing emotional, physical or professional boundaries between peers, and staff/volunteers;
  • Supportive relationships (e.g. good communication and counselling);
  • Opportunities to belong (e.g. opportunities for meaningful inclusion regardless of a person’s gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation etc., opportunities for sociocultural identity formation etc.);
  • Positive social norms (e.g. group behaviour rules such as respect for others, constructive feedback, inclusivity, culturally sensitivity, recognition of ethnicity, non-judgmental);
  • Opportunities for skill building (e.g. opportunities for physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, and social skills building;
  • Ethical practice (e.g.  approach that supports autonomy and increases empowerment);
  • Anonymity (e.g. no requirement to disclose personal data, measures to ensure confidentiality); and
  • Behaviour management processes (e.g. expectations of behavior are communicated and reinforced).

PURPOSE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY 
To provide support for safe spaces for Key Population Communities to access screening and treatment for STIs.

FUNDING PRIORITY AREAS

This funding can be used to support diverse activities including but not limited to:

  1. HIV testing, linkage to appropriate HIV prevention, treatment and care services and other clinical and support services
  2. Psychosocial and Support Services for Key populations
  3. Sexual and Reproductive Health Education
  4. Advocacy activities to reduce stigma, discrimination and human rights violation against Key Populations.
  5. Community based activities to provide vocational and life skills training

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in the six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada.

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to six (6) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

NB: Priority consideration will be given to those proposals which include Priorities 1 and 2 above.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance:  Are objectives based on good evidence asto which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency:  Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability:  Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused:  Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilisedgroups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage:  Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes:  Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of actionwith measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation:  Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’ssuccesses and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations:  Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download the application documents attached, complete and submit to programms@cvccoalition.org 

Please include subject line SAFE SPACES GRANT PROPOSALAll applications must be received no later than: October 25, 2023.

Call for Proposals

The CARIBBEAN VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES COALITION (CVC) is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

QRB-C-OECS OECS Multi-country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

A range of human rights violations impact key populations.  Multiple reports have documented how states have failed to protect key populations, from violence and human rights violations, undermining their own HIV prevention efforts. Stigma and discrimination in health services is widespread, limiting key populations access to services. Weak justice systems, and a limited culture of rights litigation results in impunity.  More generally, the application of laws and policies allows authorities to repress gays, sex workers, participants in transactional sex, transgender people, cross dressers, young people in difficult circumstances, drug users and others using arbitrary interpretations of laws on affront to public decency, loitering, indigence, and the like.

Civil society is increasingly advocating for mechanisms to address issues that impact key populations and increased accountability to create an enabling environment. This will be accomplished through reduction of stigma, discrimination, and rights abuse, due to increases in knowledge, empowerment, and access to justice and redress by the KPs, thus enabling them to assert their right to respect and dignity.

The Shared Incident Database (SID) is an online platform that different Civil Society Organisations around the English, Spanish, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean can document incidents of human rights violations, especially committed against disenfranchised individuals. It is the first regional civil society-led human rights monitoring mechanism that records, analyses and exchanges information on rights violations. It facilitates comprehensive data collection through standardized intake procedures, which enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enables data sharing to support redress.

SID hopes to advance Human rights from a public health perspective; strengthen collaborative decision-making and action on HR and Public Health advocacy; Broker between Civil Society and the State; and facilitate constructive engagement with policy, public health and legal decision-makers.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

CVC will support grant applications which fall under the following general areas:

  • Support for data entry (Human Resources, converting existing supporting documentation)
  • Advocacy initiatives to address reporting on human rights violations, which includes but not limited to: awareness building, key stakeholder sensitization sessions
  • Support to facilitate redress
  • Support for utilities directly related to the human rights violation documentation and support services

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada with a record of tackling HIV/AIDS and human rights issues.

NB: Successful applicant are require to become members of the Shared Incident Database if they aren’t already members.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to Six (6) monthsAllocation for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organizations past grant performance and proposal for strengthening and expanding its current work. Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the Application Form and Budget Proposal and the following criteria:

 

  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

 

  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

 

  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?

 

  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

 

  • Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

 

  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

 

  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

 

  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download application documents, complete and submit to programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Please include subject line – ‘SID Mini-Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: October 06, 2023

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

 

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

TARGET/ RATIONALE

Support for Differentiated service delivery (DSD) intervention models being implemented by CSO/CBO partners.

The DSD model of care is defined as a person-centred approach to HIV service delivery with services tailored to the needs of patients (taking into consideration sub-population, context and environment). Examples of DSD interventions are as follows:

  • Adherence clubs
  • Community outreach efforts to trace defaulters or provide treatment education or adherence support
  • Extended clinic hours
  • Family models
  • Fast track services
  • Multi-month dispensing
  • Nonstable patient models
  • Key population models
  • Youth models

DSD service delivery models can be grouped into the following four categories:

  1. Facility-based individual models, where clients are seen individually within health care facilities;
  2. Out-of-facility individual models, where clients are seen individually outside of health care facilities;
  3. Health care worker-managed group models, where clients are seen in a group managed by a health care worker, either a professional or law health care provider, within and/or outside of health care facilities; and

Client-managed group models, where clients meet in a group, generally outside of health care facilities[1].

 

WHO CAN APPLY?

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Suriname and Guyana
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

 

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through:

  • Training of healthcare providers in DSD
  • Contribute to access to DSD for KP

Outputs/Means of Verification

Report detailing:

Deliverable 1: Training of healthcare providers in DSD

  • Training Plan developed and implemented
  • Training manual/curriculum developed
  • Number of healthcare providers trained in DSD

Del 2: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services

Del 3: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services.

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the workplan and strategy document
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on expanding DSD must be submitted with the application.
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must submit a proposal and workplan for the expansion of DSD services
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal):
  • number of persons reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • number of person linked to care/referred for healthcare services

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

Selection of eligible projects will be done based on the scores and recommendations given by the evaluation committee. Decisions on the awarding of mini-grants will be made based on CVC/COIN’s experience with such partners and its funding priorities/ budget allocation from time to time.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s Coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, September 22, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing Sept 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$10,000 over two (2) years (US$5000 per year)

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS PER COUNTRY

One (1)

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, September 22, 2023.

Please include subject line: COMMUNITY-BASED DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES MICRO-GRANT

[1] A Framing of Differentiated Service Delivery. https://differentiatedservicedelivery.org/wp-content/uploads/a-framing-of-differentiated-service-delivery-1.pdf

TARGET/ RATIONALE

To promote the reduction in new HIV transmissions among MSM through the development of a social media campaign to increase uptake of:

– self testing (HST); and

– Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).

The social media campaign should focus on the following themes:

  • PrEP-specific health literacy (e.g., awareness, knowledge of how to seek PrEP);
  • low HIV risk perception and HST;
  • empowerment inherent to PrEP as a highly efficacious and acceptable prevention method;
  • anti-gay stigma and benefits of HST; and

PrEP and the fear that family or friends might assume that they were taking medications because they are living with HIV.

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations in Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad working with the MSM population.
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through:

  • Development and implementation of social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP; and

Sensitization sessions targeting MSM engaged through social media campaign – off-line support e.g. hotline, one on one/group counselling, podcasts,  etc.

 

Outputs/ Means of Verification

Del 1: Development and implementation of social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP

  • Communications campaign plan i.e. detailing target audience, communications objectives, message/content, expected outcome, and delivery channel etc.

Del2: social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP roll out

Progress report detailing:

  • Campaign materials developed and posted (videos, e-posters, interactive social media posts – vlogs, blogs, tweets, post, share competitions using social media influencers)
  • number of social media posts,
  • number of likes, comments, shares and saves

Del 3: Sensitization sessions targeting MSM engaged through social media campaign – off-line support e.g. hotline, one on one/group counselling, podcasts etc.

Progress report detailing:

  • Number of MSM and KP sensitized re PrEP through hotline, one on one/group counselling
  • Number of clients referred to services through offline support

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the advocacy campaign plan
  • 40% of payment triggered by the implementation of the Advocacy campaign plan
  • 30% of payment triggered by the increased awareness of KPs evidenced by the number of views/shares/hits/tweets/retweets of the campaign posts (total achievement of reach target equal to 100% of total target)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the implementation of the yr2 Advocacy campaign plan including updated/revised campaign materials and new public relations events
  • 40% of payment triggered by the increased awareness of KPs evidenced by the number of views/shares/hits/tweets/retweets of the campaign posts (total achievement of reach target equal to 100% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The community advocacy campaign plan must be submitted with the application. CVC will provide the necessary templates for the advocacy campaign plan.
  • The reach targets will be agreed with CVC before the signing of the contract.

Activities to follow up on the implementation of advocacy campaign plans should be in the template of the proposal.

 

REQUIREMENTS

The advocacy campaign must target MSM with activities tailored to address barriers to uptake of HST and PrEP.

 

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, September 22, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing Sept 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$15,000 over two (2) years (US$7,500 per year)

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

One (1)

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, September 22, 2023. Please include subject line: SOCIAL MEDIA HST & PREP ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

TARGET

To reduce socioeconomic vulnerability of Key Population Members by providing temporary emergency financial support for immediate basic living expenses:

  • grocery/food vouchers;
  • transportation to access health or justice services
  • healthcare services
  • short-term housing and utilities

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations in Guyana and Suriname working with key populations with special attention to undocumented migrants.
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

 This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through the provision of short term emergency social protection grants.

 

Outputs/Means of Verification

Del 1: Workplan and strategy document for grant awards (including reach target)

Del 2: Interim Report detailing provision of short term emergency social protection grants:

Report detailing:

  • Number of applications received (disaggregated by KP applicant, type of grant application, and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants awarded grants (disaggregated by KP beneficiary, type of grant and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants referred and linked to social protection, health, or justice services

Del 3: Final Report detailing provision of short term emergency social protection grants:

Report detailing:

  • Number of applications received (disaggregated by KP applicant, type of grant application, and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants awarded grants (disaggregated by KP beneficiary, type of grant and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants referred and linked to social protection, health, or justice services

 

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 40% of payment triggered by the workplan and strategy document for grant awards (including reach target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the interim report on the status of the disbursement of the emergency support grants i.e., completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the final report of the disbursement of the emergency support grants completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Year 2

  • 50% of payment triggered by the interim report on the status of the disbursement of the emergency support grants i.e., completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 50% of payment triggered by the final report of the disbursement of the emergency support grants completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed  after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The workplan must be submitted with the application.
  • The reach targets will be agreed with CVC before the signing of the contract.
  • Activities to follow up on the disbursement and reports on applicants in the template of the proposal.

REQUIREMENTS

  • The emergency social protection grants must target KP and provide temporary emergency support for KP in crisis situations such as homelessness, human rights violations, justice and healthcare emergency situations.
  • eligible grocery items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkins), child care products.
  • ineligible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, September 22, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing Sept 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed).

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$20,000 over two years (US$10,000 per yr).

**Maximum of US$1000 per client

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

One (1)

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, September 22, 2023. Please include subject line: SOCIAL PROTECTION/ EMERGENCY SUPPORT GRANTS

 

TARGET

To enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enable data sharing to support redress through the establishment of THE SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE (SID). This online platform is a comprehensive data collection system through which Civil Society Organisations can record, analyse and exchange information on incidents of rights violations.

 

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname and Trinidad
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

KP receive HIV, GBV and human rights related services

  • Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using SID
  • Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments
  • Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Outputs/Means of Verification

Del 1: Sensitize community members and duty bearers on SID

  • Number of community members sensitized disaggregated by population and gender
  • Number of and stakeholder sensitized
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community)

Del 2: Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using

Progress report detailing:

  • number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).
  • Number and description of cases and the legal or non-legal redress.
  • Description of the services provided (e.g., support from medical personnel)

Del 3: Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments

Progress report detailing:

  • Advocacy Plan developed and implemented
  • Number of advocacy actions completed targetting duty bearers re HRV and KP. Description and evidence of the advocacy action and outcome.

Del 4: Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Progress Report detailing:

  • SID Data analysis conducted and disseminated
  • Number of duty bearers and rights holders sensitized re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 40% of payment triggered by the plan for the collection, monitoring, documentation of cases and proposed services to provide redress (including target for population supported)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

Year 2

  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on proposed data collection and services to provide redress must be submitted with the application.
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must be a member or apply to be a member of SID to document cases of human rights violations.
  • The organization must provide legal assistance to members of key populations, facilitating their access to justice.
  • The proposal must prioritize actions and strategies in search
  • of compensation/redress for damages.
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal):
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community); and
  • number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Friday, September 22, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing Sept 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed).

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$30,000 over two years  (US$15,000 per annum)

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

Five (5)

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than: Friday, September 22, 2023. Please include subject line: SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE MICRO-GRANT

 SMALL GRANTS TO PROVIDE SOCIAL PROTECTION SUPPORT FOR KEY POPULATION MEMBERS AFFECTED BY THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

  

BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), through funding made possible by the “Global Fundis pleased to announce our Covid-19 Assistance Grant for Food Vouchers.

The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities and had a disproportionate impact on communities who are less equipped to deal with its economic impacts.  This grant is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on Key Population Members by providing food vouchers in these harrowing times. A maximum of US$2500 dollars per organization is available to purchase Food items for a 2-month period.

Community Organizations from Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad are invited to apply for this funding. Organizations are required to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores.

Permissible items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkin), child care products, and grocery items.

Ineligible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food, and any leisure items.

 

The suggested food voucher amount is as follows: 

  1. Persons / families without dependent US$50 or local currency equivalent
  2. Persons / families with dependent US%75 or local currency equivalent

 

Key Population Groups or KP service organizations from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for funding by September 22, 2023. A statement to indicate how beneficiaries will be validated should be included on the information form. Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

 

The application document attached  should be completed and sent to: programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Once your request has been approved, your organization will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organizations should be legally registered. Informal groups must therefore provide a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

 

 

 

 

Background

In recent years, there has been growing concern about the sustainability of community organizations, especially in many Caribbean countries that have now moved to upper middle-income status. The effect has been the withdrawal of donors and funding cuts for community organizations. While this presents challenges for CBOs in their attempt to mobilize alternative funding routes to ensure their sustainability, it can also provide new opportunities by causing organizations to think and act differently to ensure their long-term survival.

To overcome these challenges, CVC has been working on innovative approaches to help community-based organizations build sustainability through social enterprise initiatives. This is but one of a number of approaches that CVC has been working on, other approaches include budget advocacy and social contracting.

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) is looking to support Community-Based Organisations (CBOs) interested in generating income through a social enterprise venture to sustain their service delivery to key populations in the region. We offer online training, technical assistance, mentoring and seed funding to countries in the region.

We are being supported by different donors to do this work. The mini grants available under this call are supported by two funding sources:

  1. QRB-C-OECS OECS Multi-country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination grant that supports the six countries in the OECS namely: Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada.
  2. The Robert Carr Fund grant that supports LGBTQ+ organizations in Belize, Guyana and Suriname

.

Who can apply for funding?

As mentioned above, our small grants for this call come from two separate donors targeting different geographic countries and populations.

The OECS Multicountry Global Fund grant apples to:

  • CBOs in Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica working with LGBTQ+ persons, sex workers, vulnerable women and girls, marginalised youth, migrants, and persons living with HIV (PLHIV).

The Robert Carr Fund grant applies to:

  • CBOs in Guyana, Suriname, and Belize working with LGBTQ+ populations.

To be eligible for funding you must comply with the specifications mentioned above. In addition:

  • The CBO must be interested in generating income to fund its service delivery to the groups mentioned above and the profits generated by the social enterprise can only be used to achieve this ultimate goal.
  • The organization must have (a) staff member(s) who have successfully completed the SEA Change Introductory Course Online Course
  • The organization must be delivering services to key populations in their country.
  • The organization must be legally incorporated.
  • Must submit a business plan with this application.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

20th July 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

August 2023 to June 2024

 

MAXIMUM AWARD AMOUNT

USD$  $7,500.00 (OECS) (with possibility for extension in Year 2)

USD $15,000.00 (Belize, Guyana and Suriname)

 

HOW TO APPLY

Complete the form online here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScllYkPcbZkIGVDYZU0IBCCSXb5G2l3yztGOc9-MJJjDFUqag/viewform?usp=sf_link

 

BACKGROUND

Significantly diminishing funding has severely impacted the quantity and quality of services Caribbean Community Based Organisations (CBOs) are able to perform in recent years.  The effect is that CBOs in the Caribbean increasingly find that grants and donations are inadequate to meet current program needs, much less to expand program activities. Dependence on grants and donations can also inhibit the autonomy of CBOs to choose which program activities to undertake and to select the most effective intervention strategies to achieve programmatic goals. Most donors have their own agenda, i.e., their own views as to which problems are important and the best intervention strategies to address these problems. Furthermore, many grants and donations carry restrictions on the types of expenses that they may cover. All these factors severely limit how CBOs can act and operate in the region. CVC’s Social Enterprise Accelerator Initiative (SEA Change initiative) has been operating since 2019 helping CBOs interested in learning more about social enterprise as a means of achieving a degree of self-sustainability as well as providing employment opportunities for community members. This is our second call for proposals, and we are interested in supporting CBOs with established social enterprises with this round of funding.

 

OBJECTIVES

  • Provide seed funding and technical assistance over a two-year period to support NGO/CBO/CSO with an existing social enterprise venture that currently generates income to cover some of the organisations core costs or services to key populations. Examples of CBOs that established social enterprise initiatives in the previous round include and food and beverage businesses, and agriculture and tourism ventures.
  • The seed funding is made available to CBOs who are interested in becoming more self-sustaining. We are particularly interested in supporting ventures that can show an increase in their profits over a two-year period.

TARGET

Community-based organisations who are providing frontline services to    key populations (i.e., MSM, Sex Workers, Marginalised youth, vulnerable women and girls, Persons Who Use Drugs, migrants and transgender persons) and who are generating at least part of their income from a social enterprise venture.

 

WHO CAN APPLY

Frontline key population serving NGOs/CBOs/CSOs in Guyana and Suriname.

 

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore, funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

 

Deliverables – Business plan implementation milestones achieved by CBOs/CSOs

Definition: Supported CBOs/CSOs achieve predefined milestones of a social enterprise business plan.

Evidence: Reports on the implementation of the business plan, including proof of achievements.

 

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the presentation of a business plan stipulating yearly milestones over the two-year grant.
  • 30% of payment triggered by the achievement of the 1st set of agreed milestones of the business plan implementation by the CBO/CSO in year 1.
  • 30% of payment triggered by the achievement of the 2nd set of agreed milestones of the business plan implementation by the CBO/CSO in year 1.
  • 10% of payment triggered by a final report demonstrating the income earned by the social enterprise venture as a result of the support received by the SEA CHANGE initiative (seed funding and technical assistance)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the implementation of the year 2 Business plan milestones.
  • 40% of payment triggered by evidence of increase in agency budget as an earned from social enterprise venture etc. (minimum of 30%)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • This mini-grant only applies to CBOs/CSOs that already have a social enterprise business plan.
  • The current business plan must be submitted with the application.
  • The specific milestones and payment splits will depend on the business plan and will be agreed by CVC at the outset of the grant.
  • The social enterprises must be collective entities aiming to provide funding to increase the CBO/CSO’s sustainability.

REQUIREMENTS

  • Civil society and community-based organizations must have demonstrable experience in implementing income generation strategies, business plan development, social enterprises and have staff trained in this area.
  • The organization must have (a) staff member(s) who have successfully completed the SEA Change Introductory Course Online Course
  • The organization must be delivering services to key populations in their country.
  • The organization must be legally incorporated.

 

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s SEA CHANGE team. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

15th July 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

August 2023 to August 2025

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and general monitoring and evaluation.

A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$ 20,000 per year

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

Two

HOW TO APPLY

Submit annexes A, B and C to the email: seaci@cvcoalition.org

Please include subject line: SEA CHANGE MICRO-GRANT

TARGET

To reduce the socioeconomic vulnerability of Key Population Members by providing temporary emergency financial support for immediate basic living expenses:

  • grocery/food vouchers;
  • transportation to access health or justice services
  • healthcare services
  • short-term housing and utilities

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations in Guyana and Suriname working with key populations with special attention to undocumented migrants.
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through the provision of short term emergency social protection grants.

 

Outputs/Means of Verification

Del 1: Workplan and strategy document for grant awards (including reach target)

Del 2: Interim Report detailing provision of short term emergency social protection grants:

Report detailing:

  • Number of applications received (disaggregated by KP applicant, type of grant application, and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants awarded grants (disaggregated by KP beneficiary, type of grant and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants referred and linked to social protection, health, or justice services

 

Del 3: Final Report detailing provision of short term emergency social protection grants:

Report detailing:

  • Number of applications received (disaggregated by KP applicant, type of grant application, and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants awarded grants (disaggregated by KP beneficiary, type of grant and reason for grant award)
  • Number of applicants referred and linked to social protection, health, or justice services

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 40% of payment triggered by the workplan and strategy document for grant awards (including reach target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the interim report on the status of the disbursement of the emergency support grants i.e., completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the final report of the disbursement of the emergency support grants completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Year 2

  • 50% of payment triggered by the interim report on the status of the disbursement of the emergency support grants i.e., completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 50% of payment triggered by the final report of the disbursement of the emergency support grants completed and signed application, and evaluation report to support grant award (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

 Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed  after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The workplan must be submitted with the application.
  • The reach targets will be agreed with CVC before the signing of the contract.

Activities to follow up on the disbursement and reports on applicants in the template of the proposal.

 

REQUIREMENTS

  • The emergency social protection grants must target KP and provide temporary emergency support for KP in crisis situations such as homelessness, human rights violations, justice and healthcare emergency situations.
  • eligible grocery items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkins), child care products.
  • ineligible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Monday, July 3, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing July 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$20,000 over two years (US$10,000 per yr).

**Maximum of US$1000 per client

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

One

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than:

11:59pm Jamaica time on Monday July 3, 2023.

 

Please include subject line: SOCIAL PROTECTION/ EMERGENCY SUPPORT GRANTS

TARGET

To enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enable data sharing to support redress through the establishment of THE SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE (SID).

This online platform is a comprehensive data collection system through which Civil Society Organisations can record, analyse and exchange information on incidents of rights violations.

 

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname and Trinidad
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

Activities

KP receive HIV, GBV and human rights related services

  • Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using SID
  • Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments
  • Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Outputs/Means of Verification

Del 1: Sensitize community members and duty bearers on SID

  • Number of community members sensitized disaggregated by population and gender
  • Number of and stakeholder sensitized
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community)

 

Del 2: Collect, monitor and document cases of GBV and human rights violations using

Progress report detailing:

  • number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).
  • Number and description of cases and the legal or non-legal redress.
  • Description of the services provided (e.g., support from medical personnel)

Del 3: Develop and implement Advocacy Plans using SID data and related assessments

Progress report detailing:

  • Advocacy Plan developed and implemented
  • Number of advocacy actions completed targetting duty bearers re HRV and KP. Description and evidence of the advocacy action and outcome.

 

Del 4: Sensitization of duty bearers and rights holders re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

Progress Report detailing:

  • SID Data analysis conducted and disseminated
  • Number of duty bearers and rights holders sensitized re GBV and human rights issues using SID data

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 40% of payment triggered by the plan for the collection, monitoring, documentation of cases and proposed services to provide redress (including target for population supported)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

 

Year 2

  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (partial achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)
  • 50% of payment triggered by: (i) the collection, monitoring, and documentation of cases by the CBOs/CSOs; and (ii) KP, girls and women receiving redress or services for survivors of GBV and human rights violations (total achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on proposed data collection and services to provide redress must be submitted with the application. The templates can be found in Annex D
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must be a member or apply to be a member of SID to document cases of human rights violations.
  • The organization must provide legal assistance to members of key populations, facilitating their access to justice.
  • The proposal must prioritize actions and strategies in search of compensation/redress for damages.
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal):
  • number of cases documented in the Shared Incident Database (disaggregated by age, KP community); and number of documented cases receiving redress by type of redress (disaggregated by age, KP community).

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Monday, July 3, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing July 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$30,000 over two years  (US$15,000 per annum

NUMBER OF GRANTS

Five

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than:

11:59pm Jamaica time on Monday, July 3, 2023.

 

Please include subject line: SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE MICRO-GRANT

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

TARGET/ RATIONALE

To promote the reduction in new HIV transmissions among MSM through the development of a social media campaign to increase uptake of:

– self testing (HST); and

– Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).

The social media campaign should focus on the following themes:

  • PrEP-specific health literacy (e.g., awareness, knowledge of how to seek PrEP);
  • low HIV risk perception and HST;
  • empowerment inherent to PrEP as a highly efficacious and acceptable prevention method;
  • anti-gay stigma and benefits of HST; and

PrEP and the fear that family or friends might assume that they were taking medications because they are living with HIV.

 

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Civil society and community-based organizations in Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad working with the MSM population.
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

 

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through:

  • Development and implementation of social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP; and
  • Sensitization sessions targeting MSM engaged through social media campaign – off-line support e.g. hotline, one on one/group counselling, podcasts,  etc.

Outputs/ Means of Verification

Del 1: Development and implementation of social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP

  • Communications campaign plan i.e. detailing target audience, communications objectives, message/content, expected outcome, and delivery channel etc.

 

Del2: social media advocacy campaigns on HST and PrEP roll out

Progress report detailing:

  • Campaign materials developed and posted (videos, e-posters, interactive social media posts – vlogs, blogs, tweets, post, share competitions using social media influencers)
  • number of social media posts,
  • number of likes, comments, shares and saves

Del 3: Sensitization sessions targeting MSM engaged through social media campaign – off-line support e.g. hotline, one on one/group counselling, podcasts etc.

Progress report detailing:

  • Number of MSM and KP sensitized re PrEP through hotline, one on one/group counselling
  • Number of clients referred to services through offline support

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the advocacy campaign plan
  • 40% of payment triggered by the implementation of the Advocacy campaign plan
  • 30% of payment triggered by the increased awareness of KPs evidenced by the number of views/shares/hits/tweets/retweets of the campaign posts (total achievement of reach target equal to 100% of total target)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the implementation of the yr2 Advocacy campaign plan including updated/revised campaign materials and new public relations events
  • 40% of payment triggered by the increased awareness of KPs evidenced by the number of views/shares/hits/tweets/retweets of the campaign posts (total achievement of reach target equal to 100% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The community advocacy campaign plan must be submitted with the application. CVC will provide the necessary templates for the advocacy campaign plan. (see Annex D)
  • The reach targets will be agreed with CVC before the signing of the contract.
  • Activities to follow up on the implementation of advocacy campaign plans should be in the template of the proposal.

REQUIREMENTS

The advocacy campaign must target MSM with activities tailored to address barriers to uptake of HST and PrEP.

 

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Monday, July 3, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing July 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed).

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$15,000 over two (2) years (US$7,500 per year)

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS

One

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than:

11:59 pm Jamaica time on Monday, July 3, 2023.

 

Please include subject line: SOCIAL MEDIA HST & PREP ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

TARGET/ RATIONALE

Support for Differentiated service delivery (DSD) intervention models being implemented by CSO/CBO partners.

The DSD model of care is defined as a person-centred approach to HIV service delivery with services tailored to the needs of patients (taking into consideration sub-population, context and environment). Examples of DSD interventions are as follows:

  • Adherence clubs
  • Community outreach efforts to trace defaulters or provide treatment education or adherence support
  • Extended clinic hours
  • Family models
  • Fast track services
  • Multi-month dispensing
  • Nonstable patient models
  • Key population models
  • Youth models

DSD service delivery models can be grouped into the following four categories:

  1. Facility-based individual models, where clients are seen individually within health care facilities;
  2. Out-of-facility individual models, where clients are seen individually outside of health care facilities;
  3. Health care worker-managed group models, where clients are seen in a group managed by a health care worker, either a professional or law health care provider, within and/or outside of health care facilities; and

Client-managed group models, where clients meet in a group, generally outside of health care facilities[1].

[1] A Framing of Differentiated Service Delivery. https://differentiatedservicedelivery.org/wp-content/uploads/a-framing-of-differentiated-service-delivery-1.pdf

 

WHO CAN APPLY?

  • Civil society and community-based organizations working with key population groups in Suriname and Guyana
  • the organization must be legally constituted or have an experienced fiscal sponsor  through which to receive money.

DELIVERABLES

This grant is an activity-based contract; therefore funding is contingent upon the achievement of certain deliverables.

 

Activities

Increased coverage of essential and differentiated services for KP and PLHIV through:

  • Training of healthcare providers in DSD
  • Contribute to access to DSD for KP

Outputs/Means of Verification

Report detailing:

Deliverable 1: Training of healthcare providers in DSD

  • Training Plan developed and implemented
  • Training manual/curriculum developed
  • Number of healthcare providers trained in DSD

Del 2: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services

Del 3: DSD programme for KP

Progress report on implementation of DSD programme

  • Detailing intervention model and associated protocols
  • Number of KP and PLHIV reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • Number of KP referred/linked to DSD services

ANNUAL PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Year 1

  • 30% of payment triggered by the workplan and strategy document
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 30% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Year 2

  • 60% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (partial achievement of reach target equal to 60% of total target)
  • 40% of payment triggered by the progress report detailing services and uptake of services (disaggregated by KP community) (total achievement of reach target equal to 40% of total target)

Over the life of the grant any undisbursed funds on the grant awards shall be rolled over to the subsequent year (subject to availability of funds). Unused balances will not be disbursed after the grant has expired.

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE ELEMENTS

  • The plan on expanding DSD must be submitted with the application. The templates can be found in Annex D
  • The partial and total targets will be defined by CVC

REQUIREMENTS

  • The organization must submit a proposal and workplan for the expansion of DSD services
  • The organization must include in its indicators the following (among other indicators to be determined by the organization in its proposal):
  • number of persons reached (disaggregated by age, KP community) with DSD services
  • number of person linked to care/referred for healthcare services

EVALUATION PROCESS

When preparing your proposal, please take into account the evaluation criteria and their descriptions established in ANNEX D.

Once the proposals are received, they will be evaluated by an evaluation committee made up of CVC’s members and external experts, based the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

Selection of eligible projects will be done based on the scores and recommendations given by the evaluation committee. Decisions on the awarding of mini-grants will be made based on CVC/COIN’s experience with such partners and its funding priorities/ budget allocation from time to time.

The organization whose project is shortlisted will participate in an assessment of its institutional capacity and a review process of the project with CVC’s Coordinator. If this process is satisfactorily completed, the mini grant contract will be signed.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Monday, July 3, 2023

 

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

Two (2) year grant commencing July 2023 (contingent upon a satisfactory progress evaluation after the first quarter of the grant has been completed)

 

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Successful grantees will be given individual organizational capacity building for the finalization of their M&E plan, use of the relevant forms and web-based system and general monitoring and evaluation. A capacity development assessment will be conducted with mini- grantees to determine the need for capacity building and a plan developed. All capacity building activities will use post evaluation techniques to determine knowledge transfer and mastery.

All organizations funded through this grant process will be required to provide progress reports and to achieve an agreed set of deliverables.

CVC will schedule individual meetings with project partners to review their performance during the life of their project. These sessions will be an opportunity for partners to also provide feedback directly to CVC about its performance and the effectiveness of its support initiatives.

Deliverables shall be submitted to the technical officer as stipulated. In evaluating the deliverables, CVC shall verify compliance with the formal aspects of submission, the relevance and completion of the planned activities and the extent to which the established objectives have been achieved.

The deliverables will be analyzed and the evaluation process will be carried out within fifteen (15) working days of the date of submission. CVC may approve reports with comments, and shall communicate in writing these to the grantee so it can remedy them in the stipulated time. In the event that the deliverables are not approved, records shall be made of the reasons for withholding approval, which will be communicated in writing.

Reasons for withholding approval of the reports are, failure to carry out the planned actions, objectives and/or goals in a time and manner consistent with the activities schedule, unauthorized changes in performance, and failure to submit the supporting documentation in the stipulated format.

If the deliverable is approved, the corresponding disbursement payment related to the submission shall be made available.

The Grantee may request amendments to approved deliverables through formal request to CVC.  The amendment shall be duly approved in writing before implementation.

Subsequent to the completion of activities, an evaluation will be made of the activities impact on the beneficiaries.

 

MAXIMUM AMOUNT

US$10,000 over two (2) years (US$5000 per year)

 

NUMBER OF GRANTS PER COUNTRY

One

 

HOW TO APPLY

Annexes A, B and C must be submitted to the email: programms@cvccoalition.org no later than:

11:59pm on Monday, July 3, 2023.

 

Please include subject line: COMMUNITY-BASED DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES MICRO-GRANT

BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria, which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response. This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and reduce the impact of HIV.

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition through its research branch the Robert CARR, Centre for Action Research Resources is launching a call for Participatory Action Research grants (PAR) to help build-up the evidence-base for interventions aimed at reducing negative attitudes towards PLHIV and key populations in Jamaica.

This Participatory Action Grant will support research that is co-led by community members and researchers to learn more about the root causes of how stigma and discrimination impacts the health of community members.

This Participatory Action Research methodology is based on the belief that research must be done with people, not for them or on them. The researchers and community members that make up the research team are active co-participants who learn from one another. The research is grounded in critical reflection and is action-oriented to influence systemic change on the issues they are investigating.

 

OBJECTIVES

The grant seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  • Reduce structural barriers to PLHIV and key population services especially those due to stigma & discrimination.
  • Strengthen the evidence-base for HIV stigma interventions aimed at reducing negative attitudes towards PLHIV/Key Populations.
  • Involve PLHIV in the design, implementation and evaluation of S&D intervention and research activities.
  • Target stigma (e.g. enacted, anticipated, and/or internalized stigma) among PLWHIV and Key Populations.
  • Improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and project implementation by communities and other stakeholders.
  • Include a rigorous monitoring and evaluation of impact on issues such as access to services, disclosure, continuum of care etc.

The Caribbean Vulnerable Community Coalition (CVC) is pleased to announce this Request for Applications to provide research grants to Community based organisations (CBO) to strengthen the evidence-base for HIV stigma interventions aimed at reducing negative attitudes towards PLHIV/Key Populations in Jamaica.

Participatory action research involves community researchers and programme participants working together to understand a problematic situation and change it for the better. Those to be helped by the research process, determine the purposes and outcomes of their own inquiry. In this instance the research will be used by the grantee to help determine the evidence base of a particular stigma and discrimination intervention designed to reduce negative attitudes towards PLHIV/Key Populations.

Research grants of up to seventeen thousand and five hundred US Dollars (US$17,500) will be made available to eligible CBO’s for a research project of maximum 6 months duration.

 

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

To be eligible to apply for this funding the applicant must meet the following criteria:

  1. Be legally registered CBO in Jamaica.

Note: Unregistered grass roots organisations are able to submit an application if they have a legally registered NGO to act as fiscal sponsor for them.

  1. Be providing services to Persons Living With IBHHIV including Men who Have Sex with Men, Trans women, migrants, sex workers, persons who use drugs or marginalised youth, for at least three years.
  2. Have identified an experienced lead researcher that can oversee the research project in all its phases, and who will be responsible for the final research report. The CV of the lead researcher should be included in the application package.

 

HOW TO APPLY

Eligible CBOs will need to send a complete application package by midnight on the 28th February 2023 to the following email:

cvcdroffice@cvccoalition.org

Application Package Check list

☐ Completed Application Form (Document attached)

☐ Completed Budget Form (Document attached)

☐ CV of lead researcher

 

Call for Proposals

 

The CARIBBEAN VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES COALITION (CVC) is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

QRB-C-OECS OECS Multi-country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

A range of human rights violations impact key populations.  Multiple reports have documented how states have failed to protect key populations, from violence and human rights violations, undermining their own HIV prevention efforts. Stigma and discrimination in health services is widespread, limiting key populations access to services. Weak justice systems, and a limited culture of rights litigation results in impunity.  More generally, the application of laws and policies allows authorities to repress gays, sex workers, participants in transactional sex, transgender people, cross dressers, young people in difficult circumstances, drug users and others using arbitrary interpretations of laws on affront to public decency, loitering, indigence, and the like.

Civil society is increasingly advocating for mechanisms to address issues that impact key populations and increased accountability to create an enabling environment. This will be accomplished through reduction of stigma, discrimination, and rights abuse, due to increases in knowledge, empowerment, and access to justice and redress by the KPs, thus enabling them to assert their right to respect and dignity.

The Shared Incident Database (SID) is an online platform that different Civil Society Organisations around the English, Spanish, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean can document incidents of human rights violations, especially committed against disenfranchised individuals. It is the first regional civil society-led human rights monitoring mechanism that records, analyses and exchanges information on rights violations. It facilitates comprehensive data collection through standardized intake procedures, which enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enables data sharing to support redress.

SID hopes to advance Human rights from a public health perspective; strengthen collaborative decision-making and action on HR and Public Health advocacy; Broker between Civil Society and the State; and facilitate constructive engagement with policy, public health and legal decision-makers.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

CVC will support grant applications which fall under the following general areas:

  • Support for data entry (Human Resources, converting existing supporting documentation)
  • Advocacy initiatives to address reporting on human rights violations, which includes but not limited to: awareness building, key stakeholder sensitization sessions
  • Support to facilitate redress
  • Support for utilities directly related to the human rights violation documentation and support services

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada with a record of tackling HIV/AIDS and human rights issues.

NB: Successful applicant are require to become members of the Shared Incident Database if they aren’t already members.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to Five (5) monthsAllocation for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organizations past grant performance and proposal for strengthening and expanding its current work. Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the Application Form and Budget Proposal and the following criteria:

  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Submission documents are available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18rkmNN4VKPWNa1M3f9KbwvUc9D_RJjO7?usp=share_link

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Please include subject line – ‘SID Mini-Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: December 11, 2022

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS GRANTS TO SUPPORT SAFE SPACES FOR KEY POPULATIONS TO ACCESS TREATMENT AND SCREENING FOR STIS

 

SAFE SPACE FOR KEY POPULATION COMMUNITIES TO ACCESS TREATMENT AND SCREENING FOR STIS

Studies show that providing a safe space can be key in engaging and retaining Key Population (KP) members in HIV programming. By encouraging feelings of acceptance and a sense of belonging, safe spaces allow KPs to forge new ties with a community of helpers who can provide valuable support. The provision of a safe space is thus an essential component of effective key population development programmes aimed at health promotion

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) through funding under the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Global Fund Grant Agreement Number: QRB-C-OECS is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to support key population communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces.

The OECS Sustainability, Resilience and Movement toward an OECS Regional Health Agenda, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada. CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the key population component of the grant

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

 

SAFE SPACE PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE

The model safe spaces should seek to create a “KP-friendly” physical or virtual environment, or a combination of both, for KP members in alignment with features that have been identified to likely promote a successful safe space in KP community programs including:

· Physical and psychological safety (e.g. Mental and physical safety from harassment, bullying, violence);

· Sexuality and sexual health promotion (e.g. facilitated access to SRH services); Clear and consistent structure and appropriate supervision (e.g. guidelines for managing emotional, physical or professional boundaries between peers, and staff/volunteers;

· Supportive relationships (e.g. good communication and counselling);

· Opportunities to belong (e.g. opportunities for meaningful inclusion regardless of a person’s gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation etc., opportunities for sociocultural identity formation etc.);

· Positive social norms (e.g. group behaviour rules such as respect for others, constructive feedback, inclusivity, culturally sensitivity, recognition of ethnicity, non-judgmental);

· Opportunities for skill building (e.g. opportunities for physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, and social skills building;

· Ethical practice (e.g. approach that supports autonomy and increases empowerment);

· Anonymity (e.g. no requirement to disclose personal data, measures to ensure confidentiality); and

· Behaviour management processes (e.g. expectations of behavior are communicated and reinforced).

 

PURPOSE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

To provide support for safe spaces for Key Population Communities to access screening and treatment for STIs.

 

FUNDING PRIORITY AREAS

This funding can be used to support diverse activities including but not limited to:

1. HIV testing, linkage to appropriate HIV prevention, treatment and care services and other clinical and support services

2. Psychosocial and Support Services for Key populations

3. Sexual and Reproductive Health Education

4. Advocacy activities to reduce stigma, discrimination and human rights violation against Key Populations.

5. Community based activities to provide vocational and life skills training

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in the six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to six (6) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

NB: Priority consideration will be given to those proposals which include Priorities 1 and 2 above.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

· Relevance:  Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

· Efficiency:  Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

· Sustainability:  Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?

· Rights-focused:  Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

· Leverage:  Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

· Strength of plan and measurable outcomes:  Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

· Documentation:  Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

· Partnerships/Collaborations:  Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications using the documents attached to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line SAFE SPACES GRANT PROPOSAL. All applications must be received no later than: Wednesday October 26, 2022.

 BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), through funding made possible by the “Global Fundis pleased to announce our Covid-19 Assistance Grant for Food Vouchers.

 The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities, and had a disproportionate impact on communities who are less equipped to deal with its economic impacts.  This grant is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on Key Population Members by providing food vouchers in these harrowing times. A maximum of US$2500 dollars per organization is available to purchase Food items for a 3-month period.

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding. Organizations are required to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores.

 

Permissible items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkin), child care products and grocery items.

Inelegible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

 

The suggested food voucher amount is as follows: 

  1. Persons / families without dependent US$50 or local currency equivalent
  2. Persons / families with dependent US%75 or local currency equivalent

 

 

 

Key Population Groups or KP service organization from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for funding until June 30, 2022. A statement to indicate how beneficiaries will be validated should be included on the information form. Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

 

Applications should be sent to: programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Once your request has been approved, your organization will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organizations should be legally registered. Informal groups must therefore provide a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

 

 

 

 

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for funding to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores for members of key population groups adversely affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

SMALL GRANTS TO PROVIDE SOCIAL PROTECTION SUPPORT

FOR KEY POPULATION MEMBERS AFFECTED BY THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

 

BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC)through funding made possible by the “Global Fund” is pleased to announce our Covid-19 Assistance Grant for Food Vouchers.

The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities, and had a disproportionate impact on communities who are less equipped to deal with its economic impacts.  This grant is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on Key Population Members by providing food vouchers in these harrowing times. A maximum of US$2500 dollars per organization is available to purchase Food items for a 3-month period.

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding. Organizations are required to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores.

Permissible items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkin), child care products and grocery items.

Inelegible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

The suggested food voucher amount is as follows: 

  1. Persons / families without dependent US$50 or local currency equivalent
  2. Persons / families with dependent US$75 or local currency equivalent

Key Population Groups or KP service organization from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for funding until June 30, 2022. A statement to indicate how beneficiaries will be validated should be included on the information form. Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

 

The information form required for submission is available here: https://bit.ly/3IarZGm

 

Please download and complete the information form and submit with the other required documents to: programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Once your request has been approved, your organization will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organizations should be legally registered. Informal groups must therefore provide a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

MINI GRANT TO SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION OF ADVOCACY MATERIALS RE: HIV SERVICE CONTINUATION IN THE CONTEXT OF COVID-19

 

 BACKGROUND

 The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health emergency and represents a significant threat to vulnerable and marginalized groups. Much of the negative impact of the pandemic has been exacerbated by a failure to address previously existing structural causes of inequality, social exclusion and deprivation and the inability of a country to meet the basic needs of a sizeable proportion of their populations. This crisis has unmasked the strong linkages that have existed between race, ethnicity and socio-economic status, and health outcomes and which persist to this day. COVID-19 has undermined sustainable at a time in which efforts need to be accelerated to implement the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Nevertheless, despite exposing some of society’s most significant shortcomings, COVID-19 has provided a pathway to building a more sustainable, secure and prosperous future.

Therefore, an effective response to the pandemic, and recovering better, depends on every person being able to contribute fully to that effort. A vibrant civil society is therefore essential to “building back better,” and the free flow of information and broad-based participation by civil society actors can help to ensure that the recovery responds to real needs and leaves no one behind.

 

Across the Caribbean, various civil society organizations (CSOs) are recognized as best placed to not only identify and address the health, human rights and socio-economic challenges of key and vulnerable populations but also to provide local and national policy-makers with informed community-based perspectives to influence and steer national action.

 

INTRODUCTION

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) is the Caribbean’s largest indigenous regional coalition of civil society leaders, actors and organizations grouping over 60 Community Based Organisations (CBOs) working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for policy dialogue and coordinated responses that address vulnerability, human rights, and sexual and reproductive health. CVC has been at the forefront of implementing human rights and community systems strengthening programs and building the capacity of key national and regional inadequately served populations (ISP) CBOs.

 

CVC and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN) were successful in the submission of a proposal to the Global Fund and have received a grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in an harmonized approach to leverage and support the efforts of communities, civil society actors, governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma and discrimination and gender-based violence
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of Strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations

CVC has also received funding to support and facilitate the coordination and implementation of various COVID-19 interventions across the region including the development and dissemination of advocacy materials regarding HIV service continuation in the context of COVID-19.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support the “Development and Dissemination of Advocacy Materials regarding HIV service continuation in the context of COVID-19.” These advocacy materials should focus on any of the following general areas*:

  1. Emergency Measures
  2. HIV Care and Treatment Access
  3. Socio-Economic Issues
  4. Stigma and Discrimination

*Areas of Interest should be considered in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on vulnerable and marginalized groups/communities.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Guyana and Suriname

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$12,000 to support project related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS/DESCRIPTION OF ADVOCACY MATERIALS

  1. Give background to the development and dissemination of the advocacy materials, in particular the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges)
  2. Explain the objectives of the advocacy material
  3. Describe the key stakeholder groups, their anticipated attitudes towards the campaign and any consultations executed in order to develop the advocacy materials
  4. Briefly outline and explain the objectives of the proposed advocacy materials, indicating the expected output(s), outcome(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement
  5. Briefly outline and explain the types of activities proposed including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities
  6. Explain how the development and dissemination of the advocacy materials will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues, particularly in the context of COVID-19 such as promotion of human rights, combating stigma and discrimination and reducing structural barriers to health, justice and/or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kind of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub population?
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerable groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will the grants result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the projects successes and the lessons learnt?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential and proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Documents required for submission are attached.

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line: Development and Dissemination of Advocacy Materials

All applications must be received no later than: June 10, 2022.

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.[i] MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.[ii]

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression.  The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.[iii]

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data  indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to  support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They  are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the  the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  • strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To  improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to  five (5) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the objectives of the action.
  3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download and complete the documents available here:  https://bit.ly/3JMcNRp

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Friday  April 8 , 2022.

 


[i] Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

[ii] Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1.

[iii] Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;

2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;

3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and

4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities;

being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

 

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.i MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.ii

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression. The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.iii

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the the following general areas:

· to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies

· strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.

· To improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards

· Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings

· Community-based educational activities to:

a) increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and

b) promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.

· Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to five (5) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).

2. Explain the objectives of the action.

3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.

4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.

5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.

6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

· Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

· Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and

material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

· Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?

· Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

· Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

· Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

· Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

· Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: Wednesday February 9, 2022.

Documents required for submission can be accessed here: https://bit.ly/3o4irWl

i Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609 ii Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1. iii Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Protect Our People (POP) Campaign

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), through funding made possible by the “ROBERT CARR FUND EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY FUNDING” is pleased to announce our campaign: “Protect Our People!” (POP)

This POP campaign is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on HIV Programs for Inadequately Served Populations by supplying Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to community outreach workers, peer education teams and other frontline staff, so that they can continue do their vital HIV prevention work. It is important for these persons to keep themselves and others safe during these harrowing times of COVID-19. A maximum of US$500 dollars per organisation is available to purchase PPE for a 3-month period.

Community Organisations from Barbados, Guyana, St. Lucia and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding over the next 3 months. Organisations interested in receiving an award should send:

1. A budget for an amount of US$500 or less, listing the PPE being requested by the organization and showing the cost of each type of PPE and a list of the suppliers to be used.

2. At least three (3) Quotations from the local supplier(s) who will provide the PPE. If multiple suppliers are being used, then separate quotations/invoices must be sent from each supplier. HOWEVER, the total amount from all suppliers must not exceed US$500.

Permissible items include: disposable gloves, masks, hand sanitizer, protective eye gear, hands-free body thermometers, and hand sanitizer dispensers.

Application form is available here: https://bit.ly/3zLMwOI please download, complete and submit with the required quotations.

Please send all documents to: programms@cvccoalition.org .

Inadequately Served population groups from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for PPE by 24th January 2022Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

Once your request has been approved, your organisation will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organisations should be legally registered. Informal groups must supply a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

MINI GRANTS TO SUPPORT ADVOCACY CAMPAIGNS FOCUSED ON REDUCING THE INCIDENCE

AND IMPACT OF GENDER-BASED AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE  ON KEY POPULATION GROUPS

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.[i] MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.[ii]

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression.  The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.[iii]

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

 

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data  indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to  support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

 

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They  are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the  the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  • strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To  improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to seven (7) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the objectives of the action.
  3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Application templates are available here:  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1LsJ9sQ5QJjV2koolPEovaxeHMdpnRnhl…

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Friday  December 10 , 2021.


[i] Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

[ii] Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1.

[iii] Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants via the OECS Multi-Country Global Fund project to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to keep Key Population Communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces.

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

MINI GRANTS TO SUPPORT SAFE SPACES FOR KEY POPULATIONS IN THE OECS

 

THE QRB-C-OECS Multi-Country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination will be a three years grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. This project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

 

Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) Overview 

CVC is a constituency-based regional advocacy coalition of diverse civil society actors, grouping over 40 community leaders and non-governmental organizations working with populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS that are often forgotten by treatment and health care programme. We provide a platform for policy dialogue and comprehensive, coordinated responses that address vulnerability, human rights and sexual health.

The vision of the organization is to advocate for and participate in regional response to HIV and other social conditions based on human rights, programme effectiveness, and the reduction of vulnerability with a framework of evidence, social justice and sustainable health and development systems.

 

Safe Space for Key Population Communities to access treatment and screening for STIs

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants via the OECS Multi-Country Global Fund project to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to keep Key Population Communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces. [1] A study conducted by an Oregon State University researcher in 2015 found that the creation and sustainment of “safe spaces” may play a critical role in community-based HIV prevention efforts by providing social support and reducing environmental barriers for vulnerable populations. Safe spaces provide spots to connect, and also aided in addressing vulnerabilities, including exposure to violence, lack of social support, limited employment opportunities, and feelings of mistrust against institutions or law enforcement.

Safe spaces can be key in engaging and retaining Key Population (KP) Members in programming. By encouraging feelings of acceptance and a sense of belonging, safe spaces allow KPs to forge new ties with a community of helpers who can provide valuable support.

The provision of a safe space is thus an essential component of effective key population development programmes aimed at health promotion.
SAFE SPACE PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE
The model safe spaces should seek to create a “KP-friendly” physical or virtual environment, or a combination of both, for KP members in alignment with features that have been identified to likely promote a successful safe space in KP community programs including:

  • Physical and psychological safety (e.g. Mental and physical safety from harassment, bullying, violence);
  • Sexuality and sexual health promotion (e.g. facilitated access to SRH services); Clear and consistent structure and appropriate supervision (e.g. guidelines for managing emotional, physical or professional boundaries between peers, and staff/volunteers;
  • Supportive relationships (e.g. good communication and counselling); Opportunities to belong (e.g. opportunities for meaningful inclusion regardless of a person’s gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation etc., opportunities for sociocultural identity formation etc.);
  • Positive social norms (e.g. group behaviour rules such as respect for others, constructive feedback, inclusivity, culturally sensitivity, recognition of ethnicity, non-judgmental);
  • Opportunities for skill building (e.g. opportunities for physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, and social skills building;
  • Ethical practice (e.g.  approach that supports autonomy and increases empowerment);
  • Anonymity (e.g. no requirement to disclose personal data, measures to ensure confidentiality); and
  • Behaviour management processes (e.g. expectations of behavior are communicated and reinforced).

 

PURPOSE                                            
To provide support for safe spaces for Key Population to access community based HIV prevention and psychosocial support services, inclusive of referrals for treatment and care as well as remedial education, skills training and social protection interventions.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in the six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance:  Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency:  Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability:  Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future,  beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused:  Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage:  Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes:  Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation:  Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations:  Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups,  especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Application documents are available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1REQmMSXFKBQKr5NI88Vp2UpAarSYd4dd…

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Tuesday December 7th, 2021.

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

 

Call for Proposals

The CARIBBEAN VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES COALITION (CVC) is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

QRB-C-OECS OECS Multi-country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

A range of human rights violations impact key populations.  Multiple reports have documented how states have failed to protect key populations, from violence and human rights violations, undermining their own HIV prevention efforts. Stigma and discrimination in health services is widespread, limiting key populations access to services. Weak justice systems, and a limited culture of rights litigation results in impunity.  More generally, the application of laws and policies allows authorities to repress gays, sex workers, participants in transactional sex, transgender people, cross dressers, young people in difficult circumstances, drug users and others using arbitrary interpretations of laws on affront to public decency, loitering, indigence, and the like.

Civil society is increasingly advocating for mechanisms to address issues that impact key populations and increased accountability to create an enabling environment. This will be accomplished through reduction of stigma, discrimination, and rights abuse, due to increases in knowledge, empowerment, and access to justice and redress by the KPs, thus enabling them to assert their right to respect and dignity.

The Shared Incident Database (SID) is an online platform that different Civil Society Organizations around the English, Spanish, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean can document incidents of human rights violations, especially committed against disenfranchised individuals. It is the first regional civil society-led human rights monitoring mechanism that records, analyses and exchanges information on rights violations. It facilitates comprehensive data collection through standardized intake procedures, which enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enables data sharing to support redress.

SID hopes to advance Human rights from a public health perspective; strengthen collaborative decision-making and action on HR and Public Health advocacy; Broker between Civil Society and the State; and facilitate constructive engagement with policy, public health and legal decision-makers.

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

CVC will support grant applications which fall under the following general areas:

  • Support for data entry (Human Resources, converting existing supporting documentation)
  • Advocacy initiatives to address reporting on human rights violations, which includes but not limited to: awareness building, key stakeholder sensitization sessions
  • Support to facilitate redress
  • Support for utilities directly related to the human rights violation documentation and support services

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada with a record of tackling HIV/AIDS and human rights issues.

NB: Successful applicant are require to become members of the Shared Incident Database if they aren’t already members.

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to Three (3) months.  Allocation for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organizations past grant performance and proposal for strengthening and expanding its current work. Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the Application Form and Budget Proposal and the following criteria:
  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Click here for proposal template        Click here for budget template

Please include subject line – ‘SID Mini-Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: December 07, 2021

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.