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 BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), through funding made possible by the “Global Fundis pleased to announce our Covid-19 Assistance Grant for Food Vouchers.

 The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities, and had a disproportionate impact on communities who are less equipped to deal with its economic impacts.  This grant is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on Key Population Members by providing food vouchers in these harrowing times. A maximum of US$2500 dollars per organization is available to purchase Food items for a 3-month period.

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding. Organizations are required to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores.

 

Permissible items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkin), child care products and grocery items.

Inelegible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

 

The suggested food voucher amount is as follows: 

  1. Persons / families without dependent US$50 or local currency equivalent
  2. Persons / families with dependent US%75 or local currency equivalent

 

 

 

Key Population Groups or KP service organization from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for funding until June 30, 2022. A statement to indicate how beneficiaries will be validated should be included on the information form. Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

 

Applications should be sent to: programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Once your request has been approved, your organization will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organizations should be legally registered. Informal groups must therefore provide a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

 

 

 

 

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for funding to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores for members of key population groups adversely affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

SMALL GRANTS TO PROVIDE SOCIAL PROTECTION SUPPORT

FOR KEY POPULATION MEMBERS AFFECTED BY THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

 

BACKGROUND

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC)through funding made possible by the “Global Fund” is pleased to announce our Covid-19 Assistance Grant for Food Vouchers.

The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities, and had a disproportionate impact on communities who are less equipped to deal with its economic impacts.  This grant is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on Key Population Members by providing food vouchers in these harrowing times. A maximum of US$2500 dollars per organization is available to purchase Food items for a 3-month period.

Community Organizations from Belize, Jamaica and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding. Organizations are required to purchase grocery vouchers from reputable supermarkets or grocery stores.

Permissible items include personal hygiene products (deodorant, soap, toothpaste, shampoo, sanitary napkin), child care products and grocery items.

Inelegible items: alcohol, cigarettes, pet food and any leisure items.

The suggested food voucher amount is as follows: 

  1. Persons / families without dependent US$50 or local currency equivalent
  2. Persons / families with dependent US$75 or local currency equivalent

Key Population Groups or KP service organization from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for funding until June 30, 2022. A statement to indicate how beneficiaries will be validated should be included on the information form. Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

 

The information form required for submission is available here: https://bit.ly/3IarZGm

 

Please download and complete the information form and submit with the other required documents to: programms@cvccoalition.org

 

Once your request has been approved, your organization will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organizations should be legally registered. Informal groups must therefore provide a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

MINI GRANT TO SUPPORT THE DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION OF ADVOCACY MATERIALS RE: HIV SERVICE CONTINUATION IN THE CONTEXT OF COVID-19

 

 BACKGROUND

 The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health emergency and represents a significant threat to vulnerable and marginalized groups. Much of the negative impact of the pandemic has been exacerbated by a failure to address previously existing structural causes of inequality, social exclusion and deprivation and the inability of a country to meet the basic needs of a sizeable proportion of their populations. This crisis has unmasked the strong linkages that have existed between race, ethnicity and socio-economic status, and health outcomes and which persist to this day. COVID-19 has undermined sustainable at a time in which efforts need to be accelerated to implement the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Nevertheless, despite exposing some of society’s most significant shortcomings, COVID-19 has provided a pathway to building a more sustainable, secure and prosperous future.

Therefore, an effective response to the pandemic, and recovering better, depends on every person being able to contribute fully to that effort. A vibrant civil society is therefore essential to “building back better,” and the free flow of information and broad-based participation by civil society actors can help to ensure that the recovery responds to real needs and leaves no one behind.

 

Across the Caribbean, various civil society organizations (CSOs) are recognized as best placed to not only identify and address the health, human rights and socio-economic challenges of key and vulnerable populations but also to provide local and national policy-makers with informed community-based perspectives to influence and steer national action.

 

INTRODUCTION

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) is the Caribbean’s largest indigenous regional coalition of civil society leaders, actors and organizations grouping over 60 Community Based Organisations (CBOs) working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for policy dialogue and coordinated responses that address vulnerability, human rights, and sexual and reproductive health. CVC has been at the forefront of implementing human rights and community systems strengthening programs and building the capacity of key national and regional inadequately served populations (ISP) CBOs.

 

CVC and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN) were successful in the submission of a proposal to the Global Fund and have received a grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in an harmonized approach to leverage and support the efforts of communities, civil society actors, governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma and discrimination and gender-based violence
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of Strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations

CVC has also received funding to support and facilitate the coordination and implementation of various COVID-19 interventions across the region including the development and dissemination of advocacy materials regarding HIV service continuation in the context of COVID-19.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support the “Development and Dissemination of Advocacy Materials regarding HIV service continuation in the context of COVID-19.” These advocacy materials should focus on any of the following general areas*:

  1. Emergency Measures
  2. HIV Care and Treatment Access
  3. Socio-Economic Issues
  4. Stigma and Discrimination

*Areas of Interest should be considered in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on vulnerable and marginalized groups/communities.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Guyana and Suriname

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$12,000 to support project related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS/DESCRIPTION OF ADVOCACY MATERIALS

  1. Give background to the development and dissemination of the advocacy materials, in particular the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges)
  2. Explain the objectives of the advocacy material
  3. Describe the key stakeholder groups, their anticipated attitudes towards the campaign and any consultations executed in order to develop the advocacy materials
  4. Briefly outline and explain the objectives of the proposed advocacy materials, indicating the expected output(s), outcome(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement
  5. Briefly outline and explain the types of activities proposed including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities
  6. Explain how the development and dissemination of the advocacy materials will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues, particularly in the context of COVID-19 such as promotion of human rights, combating stigma and discrimination and reducing structural barriers to health, justice and/or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kind of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub population?
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerable groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will the grants result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the projects successes and the lessons learnt?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential and proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Documents required for submission are attached.

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line: Development and Dissemination of Advocacy Materials

All applications must be received no later than: June 10, 2022.

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.[i] MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.[ii]

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression.  The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.[iii]

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data  indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to  support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They  are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the  the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  • strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To  improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to  five (5) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the objectives of the action.
  3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please download and complete the documents available here:  https://bit.ly/3JMcNRp

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Friday  April 8 , 2022.

 


[i] Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

[ii] Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1.

[iii] Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;

2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;

3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and

4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities;

being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

 

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.i MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.ii

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression. The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.iii

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the the following general areas:

· to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies

· strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.

· To improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards

· Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings

· Community-based educational activities to:

a) increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and

b) promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.

· Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to five (5) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).

2. Explain the objectives of the action.

3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.

4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.

5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.

6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

· Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

· Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and

material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

· Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?

· Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

· Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

· Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

· Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

· Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: Wednesday February 9, 2022.

Documents required for submission can be accessed here: https://bit.ly/3o4irWl

i Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609 ii Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1. iii Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Protect Our People (POP) Campaign

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), through funding made possible by the “ROBERT CARR FUND EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY FUNDING” is pleased to announce our campaign: “Protect Our People!” (POP)

This POP campaign is aimed at mitigating the Impact of COVID-19 on HIV Programs for Inadequately Served Populations by supplying Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to community outreach workers, peer education teams and other frontline staff, so that they can continue do their vital HIV prevention work. It is important for these persons to keep themselves and others safe during these harrowing times of COVID-19. A maximum of US$500 dollars per organisation is available to purchase PPE for a 3-month period.

Community Organisations from Barbados, Guyana, St. Lucia and Suriname are invited to apply for this funding over the next 3 months. Organisations interested in receiving an award should send:

1. A budget for an amount of US$500 or less, listing the PPE being requested by the organization and showing the cost of each type of PPE and a list of the suppliers to be used.

2. At least three (3) Quotations from the local supplier(s) who will provide the PPE. If multiple suppliers are being used, then separate quotations/invoices must be sent from each supplier. HOWEVER, the total amount from all suppliers must not exceed US$500.

Permissible items include: disposable gloves, masks, hand sanitizer, protective eye gear, hands-free body thermometers, and hand sanitizer dispensers.

Application form is available here: https://bit.ly/3zLMwOI please download, complete and submit with the required quotations.

Please send all documents to: programms@cvccoalition.org .

Inadequately Served population groups from the priority countries are invited to submit their requests for PPE by 24th January 2022Requests will be evaluated and processed until the funds are fully allocated, so make sure you get your request in quickly.

Once your request has been approved, your organisation will receive an Activity Notification Award from CVC. You will be asked to send us your bank wire information so we can make a transfer to your organization’s account.

NB: In order to receive the funds, organisations should be legally registered. Informal groups must supply a fiscal sponsor who can receive and manage the funds on their behalf.

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

MINI GRANTS TO SUPPORT ADVOCACY CAMPAIGNS FOCUSED ON REDUCING THE INCIDENCE

AND IMPACT OF GENDER-BASED AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE  ON KEY POPULATION GROUPS

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.[i] MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.[ii]

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression.  The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.[iii]

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

 

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data  indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to  support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

 

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They  are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the  the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  • strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To  improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to seven (7) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the objectives of the action.
  3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Application templates are available here:  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1LsJ9sQ5QJjV2koolPEovaxeHMdpnRnhl…

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Friday  December 10 , 2021.


[i] Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

[ii] Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1.

[iii] Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants via the OECS Multi-Country Global Fund project to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to keep Key Population Communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces.

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

MINI GRANTS TO SUPPORT SAFE SPACES FOR KEY POPULATIONS IN THE OECS

 

THE QRB-C-OECS Multi-Country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination will be a three years grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. This project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

 

Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) Overview 

CVC is a constituency-based regional advocacy coalition of diverse civil society actors, grouping over 40 community leaders and non-governmental organizations working with populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS that are often forgotten by treatment and health care programme. We provide a platform for policy dialogue and comprehensive, coordinated responses that address vulnerability, human rights and sexual health.

The vision of the organization is to advocate for and participate in regional response to HIV and other social conditions based on human rights, programme effectiveness, and the reduction of vulnerability with a framework of evidence, social justice and sustainable health and development systems.

 

Safe Space for Key Population Communities to access treatment and screening for STIs

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition is pleased to be able to offer a cycle of community grants via the OECS Multi-Country Global Fund project to support local NGOs and CSOs who are working to keep Key Population Communities from vulnerability and risk to resilience through funding to support safe spaces. [1] A study conducted by an Oregon State University researcher in 2015 found that the creation and sustainment of “safe spaces” may play a critical role in community-based HIV prevention efforts by providing social support and reducing environmental barriers for vulnerable populations. Safe spaces provide spots to connect, and also aided in addressing vulnerabilities, including exposure to violence, lack of social support, limited employment opportunities, and feelings of mistrust against institutions or law enforcement.

Safe spaces can be key in engaging and retaining Key Population (KP) Members in programming. By encouraging feelings of acceptance and a sense of belonging, safe spaces allow KPs to forge new ties with a community of helpers who can provide valuable support.

The provision of a safe space is thus an essential component of effective key population development programmes aimed at health promotion.
SAFE SPACE PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE
The model safe spaces should seek to create a “KP-friendly” physical or virtual environment, or a combination of both, for KP members in alignment with features that have been identified to likely promote a successful safe space in KP community programs including:

  • Physical and psychological safety (e.g. Mental and physical safety from harassment, bullying, violence);
  • Sexuality and sexual health promotion (e.g. facilitated access to SRH services); Clear and consistent structure and appropriate supervision (e.g. guidelines for managing emotional, physical or professional boundaries between peers, and staff/volunteers;
  • Supportive relationships (e.g. good communication and counselling); Opportunities to belong (e.g. opportunities for meaningful inclusion regardless of a person’s gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation etc., opportunities for sociocultural identity formation etc.);
  • Positive social norms (e.g. group behaviour rules such as respect for others, constructive feedback, inclusivity, culturally sensitivity, recognition of ethnicity, non-judgmental);
  • Opportunities for skill building (e.g. opportunities for physical, intellectual, psychological, emotional, and social skills building;
  • Ethical practice (e.g.  approach that supports autonomy and increases empowerment);
  • Anonymity (e.g. no requirement to disclose personal data, measures to ensure confidentiality); and
  • Behaviour management processes (e.g. expectations of behavior are communicated and reinforced).

 

PURPOSE                                            
To provide support for safe spaces for Key Population to access community based HIV prevention and psychosocial support services, inclusive of referrals for treatment and care as well as remedial education, skills training and social protection interventions.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in the six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance:  Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency:  Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability:  Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future,  beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused:  Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage:  Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes:  Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation:  Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations:  Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups,  especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Application documents are available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1REQmMSXFKBQKr5NI88Vp2UpAarSYd4dd…

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than:  Tuesday December 7th, 2021.

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

 

Call for Proposals

The CARIBBEAN VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES COALITION (CVC) is the largest coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the Caribbean, bringing together leaders, actors and more than 80 civil society organizations working with marginalized populations especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. It provides a platform for dialogue on coordinated policies and responses addressing vulnerability, human rights and sexual and reproductive health.

QRB-C-OECS OECS Multi-country Strategic Response towards HIV/TB Elimination, is a three –year grant with the Global Fund aimed at eliminating HIV, TB and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) in the Eastern Caribbean. The project operates in six participating OECS Member States: St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis and Grenada. The CVC has been selected as a Sub-recipient for the Key Population component of the grant.

A range of human rights violations impact key populations.  Multiple reports have documented how states have failed to protect key populations, from violence and human rights violations, undermining their own HIV prevention efforts. Stigma and discrimination in health services is widespread, limiting key populations access to services. Weak justice systems, and a limited culture of rights litigation results in impunity.  More generally, the application of laws and policies allows authorities to repress gays, sex workers, participants in transactional sex, transgender people, cross dressers, young people in difficult circumstances, drug users and others using arbitrary interpretations of laws on affront to public decency, loitering, indigence, and the like.

Civil society is increasingly advocating for mechanisms to address issues that impact key populations and increased accountability to create an enabling environment. This will be accomplished through reduction of stigma, discrimination, and rights abuse, due to increases in knowledge, empowerment, and access to justice and redress by the KPs, thus enabling them to assert their right to respect and dignity.

The Shared Incident Database (SID) is an online platform that different Civil Society Organizations around the English, Spanish, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean can document incidents of human rights violations, especially committed against disenfranchised individuals. It is the first regional civil society-led human rights monitoring mechanism that records, analyses and exchanges information on rights violations. It facilitates comprehensive data collection through standardized intake procedures, which enhance the capacity of CSOs to document rights breaches, and enables data sharing to support redress.

SID hopes to advance Human rights from a public health perspective; strengthen collaborative decision-making and action on HR and Public Health advocacy; Broker between Civil Society and the State; and facilitate constructive engagement with policy, public health and legal decision-makers.

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support human rights documentation using the shared incidents database and other related support services.

CVC will support grant applications which fall under the following general areas:

  • Support for data entry (Human Resources, converting existing supporting documentation)
  • Advocacy initiatives to address reporting on human rights violations, which includes but not limited to: awareness building, key stakeholder sensitization sessions
  • Support to facilitate redress
  • Support for utilities directly related to the human rights violation documentation and support services

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis and Grenada with a record of tackling HIV/AIDS and human rights issues.

NB: Successful applicant are require to become members of the Shared Incident Database if they aren’t already members.

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 to support project-related costs for up to Three (3) months.  Allocation for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organizations past grant performance and proposal for strengthening and expanding its current work. Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the Application Form and Budget Proposal and the following criteria:
  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Click here for proposal template        Click here for budget template

Please include subject line – ‘SID Mini-Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: December 07, 2021

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

Civil Society Organizations operating in Jamaica, Guyana, Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the OECS can access funding for small campaigns to address vaccine hesitancy and misinformation as well as to support policy advocacy for equitable access to safe and effective COVID 19 vaccines in the Caribbean.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) has received a grant from the Open Society Policy Center (“OSPC”) to support policy advocacy for equitability. This will be accomplished through supporting advocacy for equitable access to safe and effective vaccines, once they are licensed and approved as well as urgent, broad scale commitment and investment from participating countries. There are two distinct, but related components to CVC’s initiative.

Goal #1– To build momentum within Caribbean Civil Society (CS) to push the global North for information on and access to any new vaccine for the Caribbean region. It also seeks to build awareness among civil society to monitor the scene for alternative mechanisms that might emerge to COVAX, particularly given all the public funding being channeled into the vaccine effort.

Goal #2– The second goal is targeted at national and regional policy makers to ensure equal and equitable access to vaccines for all the people of the Caribbean (coverage for some is coverage for none), and avoid a repeat of what has happened with testing in the region. It will also mobilize political leadership and international support to fully operationalize the shared commitments to global equitable allocation within the vaccine development and distribution chain as well as elevate the voice of the Caribbean so it is heard clearly on all these matters.

 

BACKGROUND

The Covid-19 pandemic has negatively impacted lives and livelihood across the Caribbean. Over the past several months it has become increasingly clear that an effective and safe vaccine against the COVID-19 virus is our best bet to achieve a permanent solution to the pandemic and to get our lives back to normal. While Caribbean countries initially suffered from a shortage of vaccines and less than expected deliveries through the COVAX facility, that is no longer the case. However, as more vaccines became available to the Caribbean the uptake in several countries have stalled. On November 3, 2021, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) reported that 1.2 billion doses of coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines have, to date, been administered in member countries. Assistant Director Dr. Jarbas Barbosa da Silva Jr. said consequent on this, 46 percent of the population of Latin America and the Caribbean had been fully vaccinated. He was however quick to note that several countries in the region are still experiencing challenges with their vaccination campaigns, noting that 19 countries remain below the 40 percent target set by the World Health Organization. Among them were Jamaica, Haiti, Nicaragua, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Guatemala, which he pointed out “are still below 20 percent coverage”.[1] While he noted that PAHO is working closely with these countries he raised the challenge of vaccine hesitancy as a major impediment.  For example, vaccine hesitancy and vaccine preference has resulted in Jamaica being forced to dump hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses.[2]

So what are the major reasons behind vaccine hesitancy across the Caribbean? A study published by the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) in August 2021 titled COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance Among Active Social Media Users in the Caribbean provides some insight. A total of 2,302 individuals from six CARPHA Member States (Barbados, Curacao, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago) were included in the study. From the survey participants 51% had received a vaccine for COVID-19, while 49% had not received a vaccine for COVID-19. Among those who are unvaccinated, 46% reported that they “would get the vaccine if available”, however 32% reported that they “may get the vaccine if available” and the remaining 22% reported that they “will not get the COVID-19 vaccine if available”. Hence overall COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (i.e., have taken a vaccine and willing to take a vaccine) accounted for 74%; 15% of the participants were hesitant, and 11% reported that they would not accept a COVID-19 vaccine when it became available. Participants were also asked whether they would vaccinate their children and elderly parents with the COVID-19 vaccine. The percentage of participants who reported that they would vaccinate their elderly parents was 53% while those who reported that they would vaccinate their children stood at 38%.  From the survey respondents, 52.9% indicated that they had no concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine, while 47.1% indicated that they had concerns. Of those who indicated that they had concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine “I am concerned about the possible side effects of the vaccine” (38.0%) was the major concern selected by participants. 21% felt the vaccine was developed too quickly, 19% said they did not know enough about the vaccine, 16% said they do not think the vaccine will protect them from getting COVID-19, 10% did not trust vaccine manufacturers, 9% preferred to use natural remedies and 4% thought that they could get COVID-19 from taking the vaccine.[3]

 

While closer evaluation of the reasons behind vaccine hesitancy needs to be done through more detailed analysis in specific countries, the CARPHA study gives us critical insight into concerns some individuals have about why they are yet to take the Covid-19 vaccine.

 

Meanwhile as Caribbean governments divert funding to pay for importation of COVID 19 vaccines, this should not result in the diversion of resources from other critical health needs such as HIV and Non-Communicable Diseases. In its 2021 Results Report, the Global Funds Executive Director Peter Sands noted, “COVID-19 has been the most significant setback in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria, that we have encountered in the two decades since the Global Fund was established. As countries went into lockdown and resources were diverted to combat the pandemic; prevention, testing and treatment services for all three dropped precipitously.”

 

In response to the above, CVC is pleased to announce funding for small campaigns to address vaccine hesitancy and misinformation as well as to support policy advocacy for equitable access to safe and effective COVID 19 vaccines in the Caribbean.

 

FUNDING OBJECTIVES

Campaigns should support any of the following objectives:

●      To counter vaccine hesitancy through the creation of messages to counter anti-vaccine narratives while taking into account varying educational, cultural and language backgrounds.

●      Social media campaigns with messaging to address misinformation, support vaccine demand and uptake and gain public confidence in the Covid-19 vaccines.

●      Advocacy messaging to ensure that resource allocation towards the COVID-19 vaccine does not divert resources from other critical health needs such as HIV and NCDs.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations operating in Jamaica, Guyana, Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the OECS.  

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$7,500 to support project-related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

CAMPAIGN PROPOSAL SHOULD INCLUDE:

1.     Background to the preparation of the campaign and how it will make the desired impact.

2.     Explain the goals and objectives of the campaign.

3.     Describe the key messages and the target audience for each message.

4.     Outline the proposed campaign strategy, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.

5.     Outline the dissemination channels and the expected reach of the proposed campaign.

6.     Campaign Budget

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

●      RelevanceAre the proposed strategies aligned with the objectives of the call for proposals?

●      EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

●      LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

●      Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.  Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. CVC will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to communications@cvccoalition.org and must include the subject line – Covid-19 Vaccine Campaign Grant Proposal.

 

All applications must be received no later than: December 01, 2021 at 5pm Jamaica time.

 

 


[1] 46 percent of Latin America and the Caribbean vaccinated. Retrieved from: https://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/news/20211104/46-cent-latin-america-…

[2] As more vaccines arrive, Jamaica dumps expired AstraZaneca doses. Retrieved from: https://jamaica.loopnews.com/content/more-vaccines-arrive-jamaica-dumps-…

[3] COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance Among Active Social Media Users in the Caribbean. Retrieved from https://carpha.org/Portals/0/Publications/Summary%20Results%20of%20COVID…

CSOs that are registered Shared Incident Database (SID) users operating in Belize, Suriname, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for small grants to support clients actively seeking redress.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

REDRESS GRANTS TO SUPPORT CLIENTS REPORTING INTO THE SHARED INCIDENT DATABASE

This call is open only to CSOs that are registered Shared Incident Database (SID) users

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) hereby invites Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) working with Key Population groups (i.e.  including men who have sex with men, trans persons, sex workers, persons living with HIV, migrant populations, youth, and women and girls who have experienced GBV etc) operating in the following countries: Belize, Suriname, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago to apply for small grants to support clients actively seeking redress.

Only CSOs that are registered Shared Incident Database (SID) users will be able to apply on behalf of their clients.

FUNDING PRIORITIES/ AREAS OF INTEREST

  • Provision of emergency medical care, counselling or other psychosocial support to seek diagnosis and treatment directly related to the incident through qualified practitioners and trained professionals i.e. medical certificates outlining the nature and probable cause of the injury and the duration of any current or likely future incapacitation etc to meet the critical needs of the client to assist with the pursuit of redress
  • Provision of nominal fees/stipends for Pro Bono legal fees in extreme/emergency cases
  • Access to social inclusion services i.e. birth certificates, social security number etc to support government registration for related redress services
  • Transportation to attend legal, court, medical or any other redress related sessions.
  • Provision of interpreting or language translation services to support access to redress services for migrants or persons with disabilities
  • Legal redress and/or court-appointed mediation costs i.e. case filing, records search etc.
  • Communications costs related to redress process i.e. phone cards for clients
  • Emergency accommodation and/or security services (max 3-5 days) for displaced clients with special emphasis on clients experiencing GBV and IPV
  • Community-based meetings and/or workplace consultations to address stigma and discrimination aimed at the reintegration of clients
  • For cases to be eligible for a redress support under grant the client must document their case in SID and be actively pursuing redress. Please note priority will be given to cases of gender-based violence against women and girls, however other cases of human rights violations are eligible for support.

**Ineligible costs include: income support to cover lost wages during the redress process, extensive medical costs, cost related to job placement, training and retraining.

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award up to a maximum of $2,500USD to support eligible redress-related actions.

***Organizations may submit multiple applications however, a client may only benefit once from this grant, as this grant does not provide ongoing support to the client.

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org. Please state ‘Redress Grants” in the subject line.

DEADLINE

The grant is ongoing – there is NO deadline for submission of applications for redress support. This grant will therefore remain open from 8th February 2021 to 31st August 2021.

Click here for more details on the Call               Click here for application form

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

 

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

  1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;
  2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;
  3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and
  4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.[i] MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.[ii]

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression.  The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.[iii]

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data  indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to  support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They  are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the  the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  • strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To  improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:
    1. increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and
    2. promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.
  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to two (2) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

  1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).
  2. Explain the objectives of the action.
  3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.
  4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.
  5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.
  6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

 

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • RelevanceAre objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • EfficiencyAre available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  • Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focusedIs the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • LeverageWill this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomesDoes the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/CollaborationsDoes the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners.

 

Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please access submission documents here: https://bit.ly/3r2xiAN

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal.

All applications must be received no later than:  Friday  July  23, 2021.

 

 


[i] Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

[ii] Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1.

[iii] Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response.

This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;

2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;

3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and

4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015). Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019). Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.i MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.ii Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression. The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.iii Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the the following general areas:

  • to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies
  •  strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.
  • To improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards
  • Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings
  • Community-based educational activities to:

a) increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and

b) promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.

  • Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to three (3) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).

2. Explain the objectives of the action.

3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.

4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.

5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.

6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

  • Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)
  • Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”
  •  Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?
  • Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?
  • Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?
  • Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?
  • Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?
  • Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners. Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Documents required for submission are available here: https://bit.ly/3bS2igf

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: Wednesday June 9 , 2021.

 

i Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609 ii Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1. iii Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago can apply for funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men.

 

The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) and its partners Pan Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) and El Centro de Orientación e Investigación Integral (COIN), have received a Global Fund grant which will bring together organizations with complementary mandates, technical expertise and constituencies in a harmonized approach to leverage and support the effort of communities, civil society actors governments and technical partners in advancing the regional HIV response. This project provides a unique opportunity to institutionalize partnerships between civil society and governments to achieve and sustain effective programs that meet the needs of key populations (KPs) and diminish the HIV epidemic.

The project seeks to achieve the following objectives:

1. To reduce structural barriers to key population services including stigma & discrimination and gender-based violence;

2. To improve knowledge generation and use of strategic information on key populations for decision-making and advocacy by communities and other stakeholders;

3. To increase domestic resources for effective key population programming; and

4. To mobilize resources for key population organizations.

 

BACKGROUND

The Universal Declaration of human rights guarantees every human equal and inalienable rights based on dignity, equality, and mutual respect (UN General Assembly 1948). Violence against women (VAW) is not only a violation of human rights, it is rooted in gender inequality, as well as a public health problem, and an impediment to sustainable development… Gender-Based Violence (GBV) includes physical, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse. GBV also includes discrimination that violates human rights, such as being denied basic necessities; being arbitrarily stopped, detained, or incarcerated; and being refused healthcare and other services (UNFPA et al. 2015).

Adolescent girls, young women, women belonging to ethnic and other minorities, transwomen, and women with disabilities face a higher risk of different forms of violence. GBV has serious consequences for women’s health and wellbeing, ranging from fatal outcomes, such as homicide, suicide and AIDS-related deaths to non-fatal outcomes such as physical injuries, chronic gynaecological problems, unwanted pregnancy, miscarriage, and sexual dysfunction. Low education, exposure to violence in childhood, unequal power in intimate relationships, and attitudes and norms accepting violence and gender inequality increase the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. Low education, child maltreatment or exposure to violence in the family, harmful use of alcohol, attitudes accepting of violence and gender inequality increase risk of perpetrating intimate partner violence (World Health Organization 2019).

Many people think of GBV only in relation to women and girls. Studies show that much of the violence experienced by MSM and TG, particularly intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual coercion, is similar to that experienced by women. Studies show that among MSM there is a high prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and that exposure to IPV as a victim is associated with increased odds of substance use, depressive symptoms, being HIV positive, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) among MSM.i MSM and TG also experience violence at the hands of their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, health professionals, and the wider community. This violence occurs in the context of extreme forms of stigma and discrimination, which can be equated with emotional and psychological abuse.ii

Transphobia and gender-based violence (GBV) deprive transgender (Trans) women not only of their fundamental rights but also of their very personhood (United Nations Development Programme et al. 2016). Transgender (Trans) women experience gender-based violence (GBV) throughout their lives, which impedes their access to services and contributes to poor health outcomes and quality of life. A 2016 Study conducted in El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Haiti found that a high proportion of transgender women experienced GBV in education (85.1%), healthcare (82.9%), from police (80.0%), and other state institutions (66.1%). Emotional abuse was the most common in all contexts however, participants also experienced economic, physical, and sexual violence, and other human rights violations based on their gender identity and expression. The research found that service providers not only failed to meet the specific needs of Trans women but also discriminated against them when they sought services, exacerbating their economic, health, and social vulnerability.iii

Experiences of violence increase the risk of key populations acquiring HIV and deeply affect their desire and ability to obtain health care, get tested for HIV and adhere to HIV treatments. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for transgender women in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Transgender women are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence, transgender women are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare.

GBV and IPV is pervasive in the Caribbean and requires urgent action at the highest level. In addition data indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence among key populations in the Caribbean and the limited access to support programmes that address their specific needs. Understanding and addressing the broader gender-based aspect of this problem will also allow us to strengthen the networks and combine the resources of the groups that are working to dismantle gender-based discrimination and advance the human rights of sexual and gender minorities. We will not make sustainable gains against the HIV epidemic if we do not also address the violence that key populations experience at the hands of family, community members, health care providers and police.

All people have an equal right to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. International human rights law establishes legal obligations on States to ensure that every person, without distinction, can enjoy these rights. By developing a more inclusive view, we can help ensure that policies, preventive efforts and response systems benefit all those who experience such violence. For many Key Population members these rights exist only in form, not in substance. They are denied not only fundamental rights to equality, dignity, health and security of being, but their very personhood.

 

FUNDING PRIORITIES/AREAS OF INTEREST

CVC is pleased to announce funding for small grants to support Advocacy Campaigns inclusive of associated/related actions in support of key population groups, specifically women and girls, transwomen and men who have sex with Men . The campaign should focus on the the following general areas:

· to improve laws and policies focused on GBV and/or IPV or to promote the development of strong zero-tolerance policies

· strengthening the health sector’s response to GBV and IPV including: screening for abuse, risk assessment, providing medical care, counselling referrals to a network of service providers, and community-focused prevention initiatives.

· To improve intersectoral coordination and monitor progress in developing national plans and policies on violence – creates commitment and political space for dialogue between civil society and the state e.g. score cards

· Development of community-based networks for coordinating services to victims, improving access to justice and promoting violence prevention – to enhance the quality of care provided to survivors, and help mobilize public support for survivors and decrease tolerance of violent behaviour e.g. coordination meetings

· Community-based educational activities to:

a) increase knowledge of legal and social rights and empower persons to seek help for abuse; and

b) promote community-wide changes in attitudes and practices related to gender norms and violence-related attitudes and behaviors against select KP groups.

· Social media campaigns designed to document disseminate and promote services for survivors of GBV and IPV provided through multi-sectoral initiatives include telephone hotlines, emergency shelters, police intervention, legal assistance, counselling, psychological care, support groups, income-generation programmes etc.

 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY

Civil Society Organizations serving key populations that are based in Belize, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago.

 

FUNDING LIMIT

Each organization may apply for an award of maximum US$5,000 USD to support project-related costs for up to four (4) months. Allocations for salaries, stipends, incentives and overheads should not exceed 40% of the total budget for the grant.

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN

1. Give the background to the preparation of the action, in particular on the sector/country/regional context (including key challenges).

2. Explain the objectives of the action.

3. Desccribe the key stakeholder groups, their attitudes towards the action and any consultations held.

4. Briefly outline the objectives of the proposed advocacy action, indicating the expected output(s), outcomes(s) and impact as well as underlying the main risks and assumptions towards their achievement.

5. Briefly outline the types of advocacy actiions proposed, including a description of linkages/relationships between the proposed activities.

6. Explain how the action will mainstream relevant cross-cutting issues such as promotion of human rights, addressing GBV and IPV, combating stigma and discrimination, and reducing related structural barriers to health, justice and /or social protection services for key population groups.

 

REVIEW PROCESS

All proposals will be considered and reviewed by a Committee, which will take into account the organization’s past grant performance and proposal for strengthening or expanding its current work.

Project proposals will be reviewed and scored against the criteria outlined below:

· Relevance: Are objectives based on good evidence as to which kinds of intervention are most effective? Does the project target a clear population or sub-population? (e.g. transgender sex workers, as opposed to sex workers in general)

· Efficiency: Are available financial and other resources (including collaboration and resource-sharing with partners and volunteer contributions of labour, expertise and

material) being used to good advantage? Does the project use resources creatively and get the biggest “bang for the buck?”

· Sustainability: Does the proposal identify how the project’s outcomes/outputs will be sustained in the future, beyond CVC support?

· Rights-focused: Is the project rights-based? Does it promote the human rights of vulnerabilised groups? Does it make reference to the international human rights framework?

· Leverage: Will this grant result in outside support or government buy-in?

· Strength of plan and measurable outcomes: Does the proposal have a clearly defined plan of action with measurable outcomes for success?

· Documentation: Does this proposal include a reasonable plan for communicating the project’s successes and the lessons learned?

· Partnerships/Collaborations: Does the project reflect collaboration between multiple groups, especially those with different levels of capacity and expertise including government?

 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CVC respects the privacy of the applicant and is committed to protecting from disclosure any confidential or proprietary information contained in a submitted proposal. While we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality in these situations, CVC, cannot guarantee complete confidentiality and/or be held liable for the disclosure of information that causes harm to individuals or groups associated with funded projects.

Groups should be aware that any information provided carries the risk of being shared publicly through open dialogue about funding priorities, peer review processes, and communications about the project, decisions, and reported outcomes. Submission of a funding application is deemed to indicate the applicant’s understanding and acceptance of these risks.

 

REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS

CVC seeks to support quality and accountable programs. Therefore, all organizations funded through this grant-process will be required to provide monthly, mid-term and final reports, and will be required to utilize the community web-based M&E platform and database designed by CVC specifically for its partners. Organizations should be able and ready to document appropriate financial and accounting controls, including measures to prevent duplicated use or misappropriation of funds. PANCAP/CVC/COIN will provide close technical support and financial oversight of all mini-grants awarded.

 

SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS

Please submit all applications to programms@cvccoalition.org

Please include subject line – Advocacy Campaign Grant Proposal. All applications must be received no later than: Friday May 14, 2021.

The relevant documents needed for submission are available here: https://bit.ly/3uaoF7W

 

i Buller AM, Devries KM, Howard LM, Bacchus LJ. Associations between intimate partner violence and health among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 2014;11(3):e1001609. Published 2014 Mar 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609 ii Betron, M. and E. Gonzalez-Figueroa. Task Order 1. 2009. Gender Identity, Violence, and HIV among MSM and TG: A Literature Review and a Call for Screening. Washington, DC: Futures Group International, USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1. iii Lanham M, Ridgeway K, Dayton R, et al. “We’re Going to Leave You for Last, Because of How You Are”: Transgender Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Violence in Healthcare, Education, and Police Encounters in Latin America and the Caribbean. Violence Gend. 2019;6(1):37–46. doi:10.1089/vio.2018.0015

Santo Rosario

Director

Santo Rosario a sociologist by training is the Executive Director of the Centre for Integrated Training and Research (COIN). Over the past 19 years his work has supported and strengthened disenfranchised groups empowering them to set up their own organizations. Examples of this include “Amigos Siempre Amigos,” an NGO by and for the MSM community, which is now a leader in the field; and MODEMU, the first Sex Workers Association in the Dominican Republic and indeed the Caribbean. Rosario is a co-founder of the National Coalition of AIDS Service Organizations (ONGSIDA) which helps coordinate civil society’s response to HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic.

Suriname

Name of organization

Target population

Project Summary 

Foundation He & HIV

HIV+ Men who have sex with men

This project provides outreach, referrals, testing and care and support for low-income HIV positive men who have sex with men.

Suriname Men United

Website/Facebook

Men who have sex with men

This project reaches gay-identifying men who have sex with men and develops media spots to address LGBT stigma and discrimination. 

BUILDING ON WHAT WORKS: REPLICATING MODEL PROGRAMMING AND ADVOCACY INTERVENTIONS AND DEEPENING CARIBBEAN COMMUN

Sex Workers

Until recently, Caribbean states characterized the HIV & AIDS epidemics as generalized, rather than concentrated among high-risk populations. This was largely because of stigma and discrimination against vulnerable populations. As a result, an effective response to the spread of the virus among groups such as sex workers, and from sex workers to the wider population, has been lacking. The consequences are striking: for example, in Guyana, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic, HIV prevalence among female sex workers is estimated to be 17%, 5%, and 2% respectively. By comparison, overall adult prevalence is much lower in all three countries, ranging from 0.9% (Dominican Republic) to 1.7% (Jamaica).

Where there are programmes, these have traditionally been aimed almost exclusively at female sex workers. However, the sex worker community also includes men who sell sex to women, men who sell sex to men, and transgender sex workers.

Click here to see more:

Mobile / Migrant Populations

Peoples of the Caribbean have always been highly mobile with movement within the region as well as to metropolitan centres and back.

Population movement has its risks and those who are most vulnerable include refugees, undocumented migrants, persons who are trafficked, displaced or deported. Members of these groups who are women, young or living with HIV or AIDS are especially vulnerable.

The most vulnerable of mobile and migrant populations face human rights abuses and hardships such as forced HIV testing, lack of access to HIV treatment and appropriate, general health care.

Mobile and migrant populations may not have the power to protect themselves, or might participate in high-risk sexual activity for survival. Migrants may experience language and/or legal barriers to accessing services and, in many instances, access to health services is quite limited. It is essential to include mobile populations in the response to HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean in order to improve their access to services for HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment.

For more on mobile and migrant as well as other populations most vulnerable to HIV, See PAHO publication here :

MSM

In the Caribbean, Men who have sex with men (MSM) – those who are gay, bi-sexual or trans-gendered, face the greatest level of stigma, discrimination and social exclusion. Their lack of stigma-free access to health promoting services, legal barriers and the fear that is generated by a hostile environment have exacerbated their risk of HIV and other STIs. It is estimated that MSMs account for 10% of HIV transmission in the Caribbean and studies estimate high HIV rates ranging from 5 to 33%.

Across the region, self-advocacy among MSMs is growing and CVC has played a strong role in supporting this development as well as direct services, anti-stigma and discrimination public education campaigns and initiatives towards legal reform.

For more on CVC recommendations on interventions for MSMs in the Caribbean click here:

Drug Users

Globally, HIV prevention efforts have focussed on injecting drug users, one of the highest risk populations for HIV. While injecting drug use is not widespread throughout the Caribbean, some researchers have found that HIV prevalence in crack cocaine smoking populations is almost as high as those found in injecting drug users. Crack’s short-lived high and addictiveness creates a compulsive cycle where the user is constantly looking to repeat the first “hit” of crack. Caught in this cycle, users quickly deplete their finances and find fast ways to maintain their use, often exchanging sex for money or drugs. Crack cocaine also increases sexual desire and can increase unsafe sexual practices that put users at risk for sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Once a drug user is HIV positive, crack cocaine use accelerates disease progression. Read more on one intervention supported by CVC

Transgenders

In most countries in the Caribbean, persons of trans experience are confronted by the challenges of punitive national laws and policies that adversely affect their basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice and social welfare. This often results in exclusion from social and civic participation; harassment and stigmatization; limited access to protection, justice and redress; and inadequate provision of health care services.

Data on HIV prevalence among persons of trans experience is limited in the region. Where information is available, it indicates significantly higher rates of HIV prevalence in women of trans experience. Estimates show that HIV prevalence for women of trans experience in the region range from 8% to 31% and there are few support programmes that address their specific needs. Where programmes do exist, they rarely include access to sexual and reproductive health services.

Advocacy

CVC spearheads as well as provides support to regional advocacy for stigma free services, social protection of vulnerable groups including removal of legislative barriers to HIV and for appropriate health treatment and care. CVC places a priority on strengthening leadership and social mobilization of groups to act on their own behalf and to impact national and regional HIV and health policy and programmes.

Priorities:

Stigma Free Services - Everyone has the right to quality health care. CVC and partners advocate for health and social services that are free of stigma and discrimination. Studies consistently show that stigma, discrimination drive fear and act as barriers to persons accessing care. As a result, the populations most in need of services are often the least served. Lack of access to health care is caused by several factors such as physical barriers in the case of rural populations, persons in facilities such as inmates, as well as physical challenges or legal, structural and cultural barriers in the case of MSM, Persons of Trans Experience, Sex Workers and marginalized youth. These barriers make specific populations disproportionately more vulnerable to HIV.

Rights-based training for health care and social workers is necessary so they better understand the social issues which affect sexual and reproductive health such as sexuality, gender and violence.

Health workers need to have the supplies and equipment to adequately respond to different needs and maintain universal precautions and at the facility level, enforcement of existing policies and implementation of sanctions when policies and procedures are not followed, is necessary to ensure accountability.

Social Protection - A key advocacy priority is social protection for all - adherence to and respect and fulfilment of everyone’s human rights. All countries have signed international human rights agreements and there needs to be coherence between these and national laws and policies. All persons should have equal access to justice: a legal framework that provides access to equal protection under the law; mechanisms for lodging complaints and securing redress and equal access to legal justice.

CVC advocates for countries to provide a legal framework for equal access to justice, policies that clearly adhere to equal treatment in services, and provide citizens (service providers, policymakers and communities) with information on rights and responsibilities so that persons understand risks and have the ability to make informed choices about prevention, treatment and care.

Strengthening Alliances & Partnership

“Two plus two make twenty-two” - CVC Executive Director.

Strengthening alliances and partnerships are the hallmark of the CVC’s work. Shared arrangements and approaches to prevention, treatment and care of HIV and AIDS are crucial. The structural barriers to accessing treatment and care have been so significant that it is only through combined efforts that effective response is possible and sustainable.

CVC has supported the formation of regional and national networks of specific vulnerable groups, providing capacity building to the new and existing networks. Working at several levels, CVC builds alliances and partnerships to build demand for and foster the enabling environment for prevention, treatment and care based on the human rights of all groups.

CVC mobilises technical and financial resources to support the work of service providing NGOs across the Caribbean helping to expand appropriate outreach, education and treatment services to key populations.

CVC is a member of a number of key organisations engaged in the regional and global response to HIV. These include, the Priority Areas Coordinating Committee of the Pan-Caribbean Alliance against HIV (PANCAP); the Executive Board of PANCAP – the Regional Coordinating Mechanism for the Global Fund Grant; the Governing Council of the African Black Diaspora Global Network and the Regional Advisory Board of the International Organisation on Migration and the Caribbean Regional Harm Reduction Network. Members of the CVC Board are on the governing body of the Caribbean Sex Work Coalition.

Jamaica

Name of organization

Target population

Project Summary 

National Council on Drug Abuse (NCDA)

Website/Facebook

Drug users

This model integrates peer education and mobile outreach to people who use crack in Kingston, Jamaica.

Jamaica AIDS Support for Life

Website/Facebook

Men who have sex with men and sex workers

One of the region’s oldest civil society organizations reaching sex worker and MSM peers, JASL is scaling-up the quality of its interventions with increased training of its peers in sexual health.

Sex Workers Association of Jamaica 

Facebook

Sex workers

This sex-worker led project aims to provide empowerment and human rights education for sex worker peers and sensitize police officers in Jamaica.

ASHE

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Marginalized youth

This project provides theatre/edutainment interventions and voluntary counseling and testing with youth in Kingston.  It has a new social media component for Phase II.

Stand Up for Jamaica

Men who have sex with men

This new project for Phase II intervenes men who have sex with men in prisons in Kingston.

Jamaicans for Justice

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Marginalized youth

This project delivers sexual reproductive and human rights focused interventions with young people in institutions in Jamaica.  It has an advocacy component for structural change.

Social Mobilization & Capacity Building

Vulnerable communities, including, drug users, sex workers, marginalized youth, the disabled , men who have sex with men and, persons of trans experience, and other groups vulnerable to HIV need to be included in national and regional policy discussions and decision making related to HIV responses in the Caribbean. Meaningful inclusion requires some training and social mobilization processes to equip representatives with a mandate and understanding of their constituency needs; effective communication and committed leadership. CVC works to build capacity in these areas to enhance groups’ and individuals’ self-advocacy.

CVC has supported regional and national meetings of specific networks and coalitions where issues affecting the communities are discussed, joint advocacy positions taken and action plans developed.

CVC offers members and grantees regular training opportunities under specific, funded programmes. Areas of training have included:

  • Health care rights
  • “Sex Positive” – sexual and reproductive health and rights education
  • - Harm reduction
  • - Motivational interviewing
  • - Advocacy
  • - Project management and development including monitoring and evaluation and finance and accounting
  • - Introduction to communications
  • - Monitoring and Evaluation

Dominican Republic

Name of organization

Target population

Project Summary 

TRANSSA (Trans Siempre Trans)

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Transgender women living with HIV

provides a minimum package of services to HIV positive transgender women as well as information about safer feminization processes and access to primary healthcare.

GAYP

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Men who have sex with men

delivers an LGBT-led community radio show addressing a wide range of health and human rights issues in the community.

CAJIR (Consejo Asesor Internacional de la Juventud Rural)

Facebook

Marginalized youth

This is a peer education model with marginalized youth in an impoverished, rural community called Vallejuelo.  Youth are exposed to sexual reproductive health information through film nights.  Community health centers are sensitized on the needs of these youth.

Fundación Red de Jóvenes Unidos de Guachupita

Facebook

Marginalized youth

This is a youth-led peer education and empowerment model with marginalized youth in several of the most underserved and stigmatized barrios of Santo Domingo; where unemployment, drug-use, gangs, and family violence impact young people’s access to healthcare and result in teenage pregnancy and STI’s.

Centro de Promoción y Solidaridad Humana (CEPROSH)

Website/Twitter

Migrant sex workers

uses peer education in Creole to target migrant Haitian women engaged in transactional sex and sex work in Puerto Plata.  It includes sensitization of duty-bearers such as police and health services to address structural violence and barriers to health services.

Red Nacional de Jóvenes viviendo con VIH/SIDA(REDNAJCER)

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Marginalized youth

This project builds on the findings of the community monitoring system built in Phase I, and will sensitize SAI’s (centers of attention, care and support for PLHIV) about the findings of the Phase I study which showed high levels of perceived and real discrimination towards marginalized youth.

Fundoreda

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Drug users

This project is a drug user-led, needle exchange program targeting both non-injecting and injecting drug users in Santo Domingo.  The project also includes sensitization trainings for decision-makers on the structural determinants of drug use and HIV, and highlights barriers for drug-user access to services.

Este Amor

Men who have sex with men

This is a peer education model with 15-25 year old men who have sex with men in the Eastern Province of the Dominican Republic.  The project tries to reach young men who have sex with men with a minimum package of prevention services as they become sexually active.

Movimiento de  Mujeres Unidas (MODEMU)

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Sex workers

This is a peer education model reaching non-identifying, home and street-based sex workers in Barahona, one of the poorest provinces of the Dominican Republic.  The project provides a minimum package of services for women and transgender sex workers, many of whom experience high levels of gender-based violence.

COTRAVETD

Website/Facebook

Trans sex workers

This peer education model aims to increase access to primary and sexual reproductive health care services for transgender women sex workers.

Guyana

Name of organization

Target population

Project Summary 

Artistes in Direct Support

Website/Facebook

Marginalized youth

This project targets young men who have sex with men and aims to give them the life-skills and sexual reproductive health information they need as young men.

Youth Challenge Guyana

Website/Facebook

Sex workers

This project reaches low-literacy sex workers in mining communities with a minimum package of services.

Volunteer Youth Corps Inc.

Website

Marginalized youth

This project provides peer education, income generation training and case management for marginalized youth.

SASOD

Website/Facebook/Twitter

LGBT

This project addresses stigma and discrimination towards LGBT people in Guyana through targeted campaigns.

Haiti

Name of organization

Target population

Project Summary 

Kouraj

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Gay men/MSM

This project delivers peer education to men who have sex with men in Port-au-Prince in three neighbourhoods.

Movimiento Socio Cultural Para Los Trabajadores Haitianos/as (MOSCTHA)

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Marginalized youth in the border town of Ouanaminthe, Haiti

This project works with marginalized youth to deliver peer education and strengthen youth advocates for structural change.

FEBs

Website/Facebook

Men who have sex with men 

In the north-west of the country, this project will deliver a peer education program targeting MSM; build capacity of MSM leaders, and sensitize community leaders to reduce stigma and discrimination.

Fondation SEROvie

Website/Facebook/Twitter

Men who have sex with men

In Port-au-Prince this project will target MSM.

Joan Didier

Member

Joan Didier, Executive Director (volunteer) of the St. Lucia AIDS Action Foundation (AAF) which is an umbrella NGO based in St. Lucia that works with a wide range of stakeholders, including the private sector, persons living with HIV and AIDS, youth, men who have sex with men, and sex workers.

She is the Director of the OECS Regional Co-ordinating Mechanism for the current OECS Global Fund Grant. Miss Didier is an experienced Trainer and Facilitator with expertise in Voluntary Counseling and Testing, Behavior Change Communication, Advocacy and Human Rights. She has been instrumental in helping to get the St. Lucia private sector involved in HIV and has succeeded in helping the private sector to develop HIV policies for their enterprises. She is a human rights advocate and assisted in the organization of the PLHIV support group TLC. Miss Didier has represented both St. Lucia and the OECS at several regional and international meetings.

Belize

Name of organization

Target population

Summary

Productive Organization for Women in Action (POWA)

LGBT/PLHIV/MY

The project uses peer education to strengthen girls and women in leadership and decision making skills; provide knowledge and support for referral services and continued access to education.

Promoting Empowerment Through Awareness for Lesbian and Bisexual Women (PETAL)

Lesbian/Bisexual Women

 This project aims to expand women’s knowledge and leadership capacity to advocate about gaps in violence and discriminatory laws in Belize through workshops on gender-based violence among other topics.

Empower Yourself Belize Movement (EYBM)

MSM/MY/YSW

This project focuses on using mobile technology and peer to peer methodology to engage, empower and educate targeted populations on their Sexual & Reproductive Health and Human Rights and facilitate access to relevant services to maintain healthy lifestyles.

Antigua and Barbuda

Name of organization

Target population

Summary

Caribbean Family Planning Affiliation (CFPA)

MY

This project is geared at sensitizing the public on marginalized groups through the distribution of IEC Materials as well as supporting marginalized youth in addressing their sexual and reproductive health by providing increased access to a minimum package of prevention services inclusive of information, education and materials for HIV/STI prevention; talks, condoms, lubricants, condom demonstration, as well as referral to HIV testing, support groups, primary health care and safe spaces.

Women Against Rape Inc (WAR)

Marginalized Women

The project implements a peer outreach program where peer educators connect with vulnerable and marginalised women to increase their knowledge of STI-HIV/AIDS, sexual health, gender base violence and human rights; increased access to comprehensive sexual health services, HIV testing and counselling, GBV reporting and counselling, increased access to safer sex commodities, educational materials; and referrals to friendly networks including health and legal referral services; increasing human rights awareness and scaling-up of community mobilisation through sensitization of front line workers including health care providers and law enforcement.

Antigua Resilience Collective Inc (ARC)

Migrant Sex Workers

 This is a peer education project aimed at training a cadre of female spanish sex worker peer educators who will connect with the sex worker population in Antigua and Barbuda to educate, counsel and support their peers on HIV/STI transmission, safe sex, and violence towards female Spanish sex workers. The project will build the individual capacity of each peer educator with advocacy skills, knowledge of human rights issues, safe sex practices and safe networking with peers.

St. Lucia

Name of organization

Target population

Summary

United and Strong

LGBT

This project provides peer education training, information, health education and communication materials, and sensitization exercises to the LGBT community as well as health care professionals and support services organizations; and the nation through press releases that inform about HIV, human right, stigma and discrimination.

Quincy McEwan

Member

Dona Da Costa Martinez

Chair

Dona Da Costa Martinez, EMBA, Co-Chair of CVC joined the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago (FPATT) in August 1985 and has served as its Executive Director since 1999. She is the Chairperson of the Prevention Sub Committee of the National AIDS Coordinating Committee (NACC) and is a member of several other multidisciplinary committees including a Technical Working Committee on Sexual and Reproductive Health appointed by the Ministry of Health.Under her leadership at FPATT, the organisation has introduced “De Living Room”, the only centre in Trinidad and Tobago providing comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care services to young persons under age 25; health care services for sex workers, and other at risk populations; the integration of voluntary counseling and testing for HIV into SRH services; post abortion counseling; and advocating for the provision of safe abortion services for women who choose to have one.

Ivan Cruickshank

CVC Executive Director

Mr. Cruickshank has been a member of the senior management team at CVCC since 2009 and has extensive experience in the field of HIV which has given him intimate knowledge of the Human Rights and HIV and AIDS landscape as well as the community-based response to development.  He has represented CVCC at the regional and global levels with distinction over the years.

Currently Ivan serves in several major leadership positions in Jamaica’s HIV response, including Chairing both the Jamaica CCM and the National Technical Working Group for Enabling Environment and Human Rights as well as serving as a member of the Board of Governors of the National Family Planning Board – Sexual Health Agency as well as the Prime Minister’s Advisory Council. In addition, he serves as Chair of the Equality for All Foundation and is a past member of the Boards of Jamaica Network of Seropositives, and the Jamaica Youth Advocacy Network

Howard Gough

Treasurer

Howard Gough graduated with honors from the Caribbean Graduate School of Theology with a Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology. While studying advanced psychiatric nursing in 1986 Mr. Gough became fascinated with drug addiction. This curiosity took Howard first to London on a European Union-funded scholarship where he used one year to qualify for a two-year diploma in Mental Health studies with emphasis on addiction management.

He returned to Jamaica in 1989 and began the development of drug treatment programmes on behalf of the government. He first crafted the treatment programme for the Detoxification Unit at the University Hospital and then moved to co-develop ‘Patricia House’ a residential, rehabilitation centre which he managed for 22 years. He has also served as consultant to CARICOM; as a Caribbean trainer for the London-based Richmond Psychosocial Foundation; Lecturer at UWI, Northern Caribbean University and the Mico Teachers’ College in Jamaica. He has traveled extensively across the Caribbean, Central and North America, Asia and Europe, in a bid to advance his understanding of addiction and the people affected.

Jaevion Nelson

Director

Jaevion Nelson holds an MSc in Social Development and Communication from the University of Wales, Swansea in the United Kingdom where he was a Chevening Scholar; and a BSc in Management Studies (Marketing) from the University of the West Indies.

He has over seven years of work in social development and communication. He has experience working in civil society as a programmer and advocate on issues relating to governance, sexual and reproductive health and rights, violence prevention, human rights, youth rights and participation and communication.

Some of his previous positions include being a reporter at Jamaica’s oldest newspaper – the Gleaner Co. Ltd.; Teacher at the Convent of Mercy Academy “Alpha” and Programme Officer & Campaign Coordinator at the Violence Prevention Alliance (VPA), where he managed two national peace campaigns. He has lobbied US foreign policymakers on Capitol Hill in Washington DC on issues relating to youth sexual and reproductive health, human rights and HIV. He has represented civil society at several human rights, youth development and HIV meetings, including speaking on panels on Capitol Hill and the UN High level Meeting on HIV.

Ian McKnight

Member

Ian McKnight, MSc, has been involved in HIV development work since 1991 when he co-founded Jamaica AIDS Support for Life (JASL), serving as its Executive Director from 1991 until 2002. He later served as Director of Targeted Interventions and Director for Social Marketing and Public Education. He was the Violence Prevention Specialist and Media and Communications Specialist on JA-STYLE, a USAID-funded/Ministry of Health adolescent reproductive health project and later became the Programmes Manager of the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC) from 2006-November 2009 and Executive Director from 2009 – 2013.

As a Facilitator, McKnight has given service to PANCAP/CARICOM’s “Champion for Change” initiative and the Saint Maarten National HIV Programme’s Advocacy and Policy Development Training. As a trainer, McKnight’s clients include UNIFEM, Fluid Bodies Project in New York, the Caribbean HIV AIDS Alliance, Kwanza Productions and Value Added Services.

Ethel Pengel

Member

Ethel Pengel is the founder and CEO of the Double Positive Foundation which is an NGO in Surinam catering for women and girls affected by and living with HIV. As someone who is herself a woman living with HIV, she has been involved with numerous local and regional entities inclusive of the Caribbean Network of Sero-Positives (CRN +). She is a member of Suriname’s Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) and a member of the Advisory Board of the Ministry of Health regarding HIV/AIDS.

She has managed two grassroots organizations (Stichting Broko Doro and Stichting Mamio Namen project Suriname) both of which had an enviable track record of providing care,support and income generating opportunities for persons living with HIV.

R. Anthony Lewis

Secretary

R. Anthony Lewis, PhD. serves as CVC Board Secretary. He has been an advocate and strategist on human rights and social justice issues since he was a teenager, and went on to work as a reporter specializing in, among other things, HIV and AIDS reporting (1993 – 1995). He was Director of Advocacy and Public Education at Jamaica AIDS Support between 2003 and 2005 and also worked in Targeted Interventions for MSM, inmates and sex workers. He is a trained translator who speaks French, Spanish, English, Jamaican and Haitian Kreyol.

He has represented CVC in a number of regional and international fora, including the 17th Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers meeting, the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City, the Global Forum on MSM and HIV Pre-Conference, training meetings of the PANCAP law, ethics and human rights program; and the PANCAP Regional Condom Policy process with a mandate to ensure it addressed an enabling environment for condom access for youth, sex workers, gay and bisexual men, and other at risk groups.

ethnography of masculine sexual work carried out by Columbia University and Amigos Siempre Amigos (ASA) in the Dominican Republic, as well as other studies to design and develop educational material on human sexuality, HIV and AIDS, and Sexual Transmission Disease (STD).

Marginalized Children & Youth

The AIDS epidemic has orphaned approximately 250,000 Caribbean children, according to data given in the US-Caribbean Regional HIV & AIDS Partnership Framework 2010-2014. The Caribbean Regional Strategic Framework on HIV/AIDS 2008- 2012 shows that HIV prevalence rates in young people range from 0.08% to 3.2%. In the Caribbean cultural norms and specific policies and Laws make it difficult for youth to access sexual, reproductive and HIV health services. Girls and young women face risks of abuse due to myths about cures for STIs as well as pressures for inter-generational and/or transactional sex due to poverty.